Title: Kathryn H. Jacobsen - Description: Text

 

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Kathryn H. Jacobsen, PhD, MPH, is a professor of epidemiology and global health at George Mason University who conducts research on health transitions, the shifts in population disease burden that occur with socioeconomic development, globalization, and environmental change. As an expert on the transitioning epidemiology of hepatitis A virus in countries across the globe, she has provided technical expertise to the World Health Organization (WHO), the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) project, Gavi (the Vaccine Alliance), and other groups. Her research portfolio also includes analyses of emerging infectious diseases, adolescent risk behaviors and injuries, and other public health concerns. She has authored more than 185 scientific articles. She also serves on journal editorial boards and grant review panels, and she frequently provides health and medical commentary for print and television media.

 

Dr. Jacobsen teaches courses on global health, epidemiology, and prevention and control of communicable and noncommunicable diseases. She also mentors undergraduate and graduate research students and leads research writing seminars for faculty and doctoral students. In 2013, she was honored with George Mason University's Teaching Excellence Award. She is the author of two popular textbooks: Introduction to Global Health (now in its 3rd edition) and Introduction to Health Research Methods: A Practical Guide (the 3rd edition was just released). She co-chairs the Subcommittee on Master's and Undergraduate Degrees in Global Health (SMUDGH) for the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH).

 

 

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Contact Information

Kathryn H. Jacobsen, MPH, PhD

Professor of Epidemiology & Global Health

Department of Global & Community Health

George Mason University

 

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Introduction to Global Health

 

Title: Book cover IGH 3

 

(Click on the book cover above to access free sample chapters from the publisher's website.)

 

 

 

Global health is a dynamic multidisciplinary field that uses a diversity of interventions to promote sustainable economic growth, support human rights, mitigate threats to security, and help people around the world live longer, healthier lives. The 3rd edition of Introduction to Global Health presents the full set of topics that are now included as part of the global health agenda and routinely covered in introductory global health courses. The opening chapters explain health transitions, the links between the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and global health priorities, the socioeconomic and environmental determinants of health, the connections between health and human rights, and the funding and implementation of global public health initiatives. The middle chapters present the major contributors to the global burden of disease, emphasizing strategies for the prevention and control of infectious diseases, reproductive health concerns, nutritional disorders, noncommunicable diseases, mental health disorders, and injuries. The final chapters summarize health promotion strategies across the lifespan.

 

Chapters in the 3rd edition (published in 2018):

 

1: Global health transitions

2: Global health priorities

3: Socioeconomic determinants of health

4: Environmental determinants of health

5: Health and human rights

6: Global health financing

7: Global health implementation

 

8: HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis

9: Diarrheal, respiratory, and other common infections

10: Malaria and neglected tropical diseases

11: Reproductive health

12: Nutrition

13: Cancer

14: Cardiovascular diseases

15: Other noncommunicable diseases

16: Mental health

17: Injuries

 

18: Promoting neonatal, infant, child, and adolescent health

19: Promoting healthy adulthood and aging

20: Global health careers

 

Title: Old IGH covers

Previous editions:

Title: Book cover IGH 2 in Korean

A Korean translation of the 2nd edition of this book is available:

국제보건학.

Grid showing population and practice domains of global health MPH educationRecent publications on trends in global health education:

·       Jacobsen KH, Zeraye HA, Bisesi MS, Gartin M, Malouin RA, Waggett CE. Master of Public Health (MPH) concentrations in global health in 2020: preparing culturally competent professionals to address health disparities in the context of globalization. Health Promotion Practice. In press. Global health MPH programs tend to be located at the center of the population-practice grid shown at right.

·       Jacobsen KH, Hay MC, Manske JM, Waggett CE. Curricular models and learning objectives for undergraduate minors in global health. Annals of Global Health. 2020 (Aug 19); 86(1):102. Open Access PDF. This manuscript introduces 5 curricular models currently being used for global health minors, and it presents the CUGH recommended undergraduate global health student learning objectives.

·       Waggett CE, Jacobsen KH. Global health and public health majors and minors at 411 universities, 2019-2020. Annals of Global Health. 2020 (June 19); 86(1):65. Open Access PDF. Global health is a growth area in undergraduate education, especially at large universities and liberal arts colleges.

·       Jacobsen KH, Li X, Gartin M, Malouin R, Waggett CE. Master of Science (MS) and Master of Arts (MA) degrees in global health: applying interdisciplinary research skills to the study of globalization-related health disparities. Pedagogy in Health Promotion. 2020 Mar; 6(1):14-22. Research-focused global health master's degrees prepare students for a different role than practice-focused MPH and clinical degrees.

·       Jacobsen KH, Zeraye HA, Bisesi MS, Gartin M, Malouin RA, Waggett CE. Master of Public Health (MPH) global health concentration competencies: preparing culturally-skilled practitioners to serve internationally, nationally, and locally. American Journal of Public Health. 2019 Sept; 109(9):1189-1190. Global public health competencies are valuable for local practice as well as work with international organizations.

 

 

Introduction to Health Research Methods: A Practical Guide

 

book cover IHRM 3

 

(Click on the book cover above to access free sample chapters from the publisher's website.)

 

 

 

Introduction to Health Research Methods empowers new investigators to conduct their own original research projects. The five sections of the text provide a step-by-step guide to conducting quantitative and qualitative research in medicine, public health, nursing, and other health disciplines. The book covers the entire research process from identifying a study question and selecting a study approach to collecting and analyzing data to disseminating the findings through presentation or publication. Primary studies (collection of new data), secondary analyses (analysis of existing data), and tertiary studies (literature reviews and meta-analyses) are all described, and elements of research ethics are woven throughout the book. By breaking the research process down into manageable steps, Introduction to Health Research Methods communicates the excitement and importance of health research, encouraging students and early career scholars to make their own contributions to improving the health of individuals and communities through research.

 

Chapters in the 3rd edition (published in 2020):

 

Step 1: Identifying a Study Question

The Health Research Process | Selecting a Research Question | Reviewing the Literature | Defining Specific Aims | Professional Development | Coauthoring

 

Step 2: Selecting a Study Approach

Overview of Study Designs | Case Series | Cross-Sectional Surveys | Case-Control Studies | Cohort Studies | Experimental Studies | Qualitative Studies | Correlational Studies | Synthesis Research

 

Step 3: Designing the Study and Collecting Data

Research Protocols | Ethical Considerations | Ethical Review and Approval | Population Sampling | Sample Size and Power | Questionnaire Development | Collecting Quantitative Data | Collecting Qualitative Data | Additional Assessments | Secondary Analyses | Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis | Writing Grant Proposals

 

Step 4: Analyzing Data

Data Management | Descriptive Statistics | Comparative Statistics | Regression Analysis | Qualitative Analysis | Additional Analysis Tools

 

Step 5: Reporting Findings

Posters and Presentations | Article Structure | Citing | Critically Revising | Writing Success Strategies | Reasons to Publish | Selecting Target Journals | Manuscript Submission | Peer Review and Publication

 

Old IHRM coversTitle: Book cover IHRM 1

Previous editions:

Title: Book cover IHRM 1 in Korean

A Korean translation of the 1st edition of this book is available:

보건의료 연구방법론.

 

 

Health Transitions

Words health transition on a rainbow-colored background

What are health transitions?

 

As recently as 100 years ago, most populations around the world had similar health profiles: high birth rates, high rates of pregnancy-related death among reproductive-age women, high death rates, short life expectancies, and a lot of disease and death due to infections and undernutrition. During the 20th century, most high-income nations made a transition to a lower birth rate (the fertility transition), a lower maternal mortality rate (the obstetric transition), a lower overall death rate (the mortality transition), longer life expectancies and an aging population (the demographic transition), and a higher burden from chronic diseases (the epidemiologic transition) related to overnutrition (the nutrition transition) and a shift from environmental hazards (like unsafe drinking water) to lifestyle factors (like physical inactivity) being the primary modifiable causes of illness and death (the risk transition). For example, in the United States, the leading causes of death in 1900 were infectious diseases: pneumonia and influenza, tuberculosis, and diarrhea. By 1950, the most common causes of death were same noncommunicable diseases that are the leading causes of mortality in the U.S. today: heart disease, cancer, and stroke. Low-income countries have not experienced such dramatic changes. As a result, there are now significant differences in health status and access to the tools for health in low-income and high-income countries.

 

In very LOW income populations...

In very HIGH income populations...

·       There are high rates of poverty, illiteracy, and unemployment, which can have negative effects on personal, family, and community health

·       Most people have access to the basic tools for health, although there are still health disparities based on socioeconomic status

·       Many people do not have access to an outhouse or other type of toilet and many do not have reliable access to safe drinking water

·       Almost everyone has indoor plumbing and safe drinking water

·       Many infants and young children die from diarrhea, pneumonia, malaria, and other infections

·       Almost every baby will survive to adulthood

·       The typical woman gives birth to many children, and it is not uncommon for women to die in childbirth

·       The typical woman gives birth to 1 or 2 children, and very few women die due to pregnancy-related conditions

·       The median (average) age of the population is in childhood

·       The median (average) age of the population is in adulthood

·       A typical age at death for adults is 60 or 70 years old

·       A typical age at death for adults is 80 or even 90 years old

·       Visits to hospitals and clinics are usually for infections (such as malaria or tuberculosis) or serious injuries

·       Visits to hospitals and clinics are usually for chronic noncommunicable diseases (such as arthritis, back pain, hypertension, and diabetes)

·       Access to effective management of chronic diseases (such as hypertension and diabetes) is very limited

·       Screening tests (such as mammography for breast cancer) often detect emerging health problems early, when they are usually more treatable

·       Undernutrition (including protein energy and micronutrient deficiencies) remains a significant public health concern

·       Overweight and obesity are major public health concerns, and many people have diets that are too high in fat and calories

·       Very few people with mental health disorders receive clinical care, because there are so few psychiatrists and psychologists

·       Clinical mental health services are usually available, but they are often underused

·       Serious injuries often lead to death because no surgical services are available

·       Serious injuries can often be treated with surgery and rehabilitation

 

What is the health profile of a population undergoing these health transitions?

 

Although the differences in the health profiles of low-income and high-income populations are dramatic, the initial steps of the transition process remain obscure. Middle-income populations often continue to be burdened by acute infectious diseases and hunger among children while also caring for a growing number of older adults with chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), a situation called the dual burden in classic health transitions theory.

 

Why do research about health transitions?

 

Understanding health transitions is important for identifying priorities for public health interventions and for planning for the future healthcare needs of populations. Many questions about the health transition process remain unanswered, including:

 

How do populations move from the "before" (pre-transition) health profile to the "after" (post-transition) health profile?

What does population health status look like during the transition?

 

Health transitions epidemiologists use longitudinal studies to follow groups of people for many years, global health metrics to compare health status in different populations, mathematical models to make projections about future trends, and other methods to try to understand the shifts in population health status that are occurring in every world region.

 

 

 

Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) Epidemiology

Words hepatitis A and globalization on a world map

 

What is the hepatitis A paradox?

 

Tens of millions of individuals worldwide become infected with hepatitis A virus (HAV) each year via contaminated food or water or contact with an infectious person. Young children usually have no symptoms of disease. Older children and adults often experience several weeks of jaundice and a lengthy convalescence, and they are at risk of acute liver failure and death. The HAV incidence rate is strongly correlated with socioeconomic indicators. As incomes rise and access to clean water increases, the incidence of HAV decreases and the average age at infection goes up. Because older HAV patients are usually so much sicker than young children who become infected, a decrease in the HAV incidence rate often means an increase in the number of hospitalizations and deaths from hepatitis A in the population.

 

How does hepatitis A relate to health transitions?

 

In very low-income countries, few clinical cases of hepatitis A are diagnosed because nearly all young children become infected and develop lifelong immunity without ever having jaundice. As low-income communities develop into middle-income economies, the burden from hepatitis A disease may increase because improved infrastructure leaves a growing proportion of older children and adults susceptible to severe hepatitis A disease. Vaccination is often considered to be a cost-effective way to keep residents of transition economies healthy. Vaccines are also important for protecting travelers from low-endemicity to high-endemicity areas.

 

What research methods are useful for HAV global burden of disease research?

 

Meta-analyses and mathematical models that synthesize newly published information about age-specific anti-IgG seroprevalence rates can be used to update country-level endemicity estimates and to impute values for countries and subnational areas with no recent data. The resulting information is essential for development of evidence-based vaccine recommendations.

 

Words WHO report on HAV on a world map

Words risk factors for HAV on a striped background

 

 

Infectious Disease Epidemiology

Words COVID preparedness on a picture of coronavirus

 

Does every country need to worry about infectious diseases?

 

The coronavirus pandemic has made the answer to this question an obvious yes. Infection morbidity and mortality rates are lower in high income countries than in low income countries, but every country in the world remains at risk of pandemics of influenza and other pathogens, foodborne outbreaks (including those caused by hepatitis A virus), the spread of drug resistant microbes both inside and outside of hospitals and other healthcare facilities, and other emerging infectious disease (EID) threats, including the threats of pandemics like coronavirus.

 

Does a community with newly-acquired access to clean water and toilets, insecticide-treated bednets, vaccines, or other tools for health immediately become healthier?

 

Not necessarily, since many health tools are only effective when they are consistently used by nearly all members of the community. One goal of infectious disease epidemiology research is to understand the human behaviors that facilitate or inhibit the reduction of infection incidence. For example, studies of perceptions about vaccine safety and efficacy that include perspectives from diverse populations are an important part of understanding vaccine-related beliefs and practices.

 

Are the infectious diseases that affect populations stable or in transition?

 

The mix of infections that occur in a community usually changes a bit every year depending on biological, social, and environmental factors. Drug resistance, vaccine availability, weather, human behaviors, access to healthcare services and antibiotics, travel and migration, and other factors can all influence the particular mix of infectious diseases circulating in a population. Climate change may also be affecting the distribution of infectious diseases, especially vectorborne infections that are transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks, and other insects and arachnids. Infectious disease epidemiology research methods can be used to study changes in local disease ecology over time.

 

Word Ebola on a picture of the Ebola virus

Words Zika risk perceptions on a photo of an Aedes mosquito

Publications about COVID-19:

·       Jacobsen GD, Jacobsen KH. Statewide COVID-19 stay-at-home orders and population mobility in the United States. World Medical & Health Policy. 2020 Dec; 12(4): In press. Open Access PDF.

·       Vraga EK, Jacobsen KH. Strategies for effective health communication during the coronavirus pandemic and future emerging infectious disease events. World Medical & Health Policy. 2020 Sept; 12(3):233-241.

·       Jacobsen KH, Vraga EK. Improving communication about COVID-19 and other emerging infectious diseases [letter]. European Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2020 May; 50(5):e13225. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH. Will COVID-19 generate global preparedness? The Lancet. 2020 Mar 28; 395(10229):1013-1014. Open Access PDF.

 

 

Adolescent Health, Injuries, & Emerging NCDs

Words sports injuries in 25 countries over a photo of a hand in a cast

 

Why do health perceptions and practices matter?

 

Demographic transitions are occurring in most world regions. Fertility rates are decreasing, and the number of older adults and the proportion of older adults in the population are rapidly increasing. Nutritional profiles are also shifting, with obesity becoming more common in every country of the world. Cardiovascular diseases are already the leading cause of death in every country in the world, and adults in low- and middle-income countries face a growing risk of developing cancers, chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes, and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Preventive medicine interventions (such as hypertension management and cancer screening) are extending lives while increasing the likelihood that older adults will survive long enough to develop multiple comorbid (concurrent) NCDs. Health behaviors related to diet, exercise, substance use, and management of medical conditions can reduce the risk of some NCDs and increase the quality of life for people with them.

 

Why study adolescent and young adult health?

 

Title: GSHS logoOne of the most cost-effective ways to prevent or postpone disability in older adulthood is to encourage adolescents and young adults to establish healthy behaviors. Older children and adolescents around the globe may experiment with risk behaviors such as alcohol and tobacco use, and they may engage in bullying and other harmful social behaviors. These behaviors may cause acute injuries. They may also increase the risk of long-term disability and chronic illness. There are many studies underway that use common questionnaire banks and data collection methods to compile comparable adolescent health data from dozens of countries. The datasets are often made available to the public for analysis. One example is the Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS), which is sponsored by the U.S. CDC and the World Health Organization.

 

What other tools are available for studying health beliefs and behaviors?

 

Many research tools are available for studying how people perceive of their own health risks and the steps they take or do not take to protect themselves from illnesses and injuries. For example, a KAP survey examines health knowledge, attitudes / perceptions / beliefs, and practices / behaviors and social media analytics can provide insights about how people communicate about health topics, including how misinformation is generated and spread.

 

Words diabetes in West Africa over an image of blood glucose monitoring supplies

Words cancer and social media over an image of icons for social media apps

 

 

Publications

 

·       Jacobsen GD, Jacobsen KH. Statewide COVID-19 stay-at-home orders and population mobility in the United States. World Medical & Health Policy. 2020 Dec; 12(4): In press. Open Access PDF.

·       Oh KM, Park B, Jacobsen KH. A qualitative analysis of barriers to colorectal cancer screening among Korean Americans. Journal of Cancer Education. In press.

·       Jacobsen KH, Zeraye HA, Bisesi MS, Gartin M, Malouin RA, Waggett CE. Master of Public Health (MPH) concentrations in global health in 2020: preparing culturally competent professionals to address health disparities in the context of globalization. Health Promotion Practice. In press.

·       Andani A, van Elten TM, Bunge EM, Marano C, Salgado F, Jacobsen KH. Hepatitis A epidemiology in Latin American countries: a 2020 view from a systematic literature review. Expert Review of Vaccines. 2020 Sept; 19(9):795-805. Open Access PDF. Video about the article.

·       Vraga EK, Jacobsen KH. Strategies for effective health communication during the coronavirus pandemic and future emerging infectious disease events. World Medical & Health Policy. 2020 Sept; 12(3):233-241.

·       Jacobsen KH, Hay MC, Manske JM, Waggett CE. Curricular models and learning objectives for undergraduate minors in global health. Annals of Global Health. 2020 (Aug 19); 86(1):102. Open Access PDF.

·       Waggett CE, Jacobsen KH. Global health and public health majors and minors at 411 universities, 2019-2020. Annals of Global Health. 2020 (June 19); 86(1):65. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH, Vraga EK. Improving communication about COVID-19 and other emerging infectious diseases [letter]. European Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2020 May; 50(5):e13225. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH. Will COVID-19 generate global preparedness? The Lancet. 2020 Mar 28; 395(10229):1013-1014. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH, Li X, Gartin M, Malouin R, Waggett CE. Master of Science (MS) and Master of Arts (MA) degrees in global health: applying interdisciplinary research skills to the study of globalization-related health disparities. Pedagogy in Health Promotion. 2020 Mar; 6(1):14-22.

·       Leski TA, Taitt CR, Swaray AG, Bangura U, Reynolds N, Holtz A, Yasuda C, Lahai J, Lamin JM, Baio V, Jacobsen KH, Ansumana R, Stenger DA. Use of real-time multiplex PCR, malaria rapid diagnostic test and microscopy to investigate the prevalence of Plasmodium species among febrile hospital patients in Sierra Leone. Malaria Journal. 2020 (Feb 21); 19:84. Open Access PDF.

·       Sauter SR, Kim LP, Jacobsen KH. Loneliness and friendlessness among adolescents in 25 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Child and Adolescent Mental Health. 2020 Feb; 25(1):21-27.

·       Cummings PR, Cummings DB, Jacobsen KH. Obstructed labor as an underlying cause of maternal mortality in Kalukembe, Angola, 2017. Journal of Global Health Reports. 2019 (Nov 6); 3:e2019065. Open Access PDF.

·       Doobay-Persaud A, Evert J, DeCamp M, Evans CT, Jacobsen KH, Sheneman NE, Goldstein JL, Nelson BD. Extent, nature and consequences of performing outside scope of training in global health. Globalization & Health. 2019 (Nov 1); 15:60. Open Access PDF.

·       McCoy JD, Painter JE, Jacobsen KH. Perceptions of vaccination within a Christian homeschooling community in Pennsylvania. Vaccine. 2019 Sept 10; 37(38):5770-5776. Response letter: 2019 Sept 10; 37(38):5667.

·       Jacobsen KH, Zeraye HA, Bisesi MS, Gartin M, Malouin RA, Waggett CE. Master of Public Health (MPH) global health concentration competencies: preparing culturally-skilled practitioners to serve internationally, nationally, and locally. American Journal of Public Health. 2019 Sept; 109(9):1189-1190.

·       Doobay-Persaud A, Evert J, DeCamp M, Evans CT, Jacobsen KH, Sheneman NE, Goldstein JL, Nelson BD. Practising beyond one's scope while working abroad. The Lancet Global Health. 2019 Aug; 7(8):e1009-1010. Open Access PDF.

·       Itote EW, Fleming LC, Mallinson RK, Gaffney KF, Jacobsen KH. Knowledge of intrapartum care among obstetric care providers in rural Kenya. International Health. 2019 July; 11(4):258-264.

·       Hillson R, Coates AR, Alejandre JD, Jacobsen KH, Ansumana R, Bockarie AS, Bangura U, Lamin JM, Stenger DA. Estimating the size of urban populations using Landsat images: a case study of Bo, Sierra Leone, West Africa. International Journal of Health Geographics. 2019 (July 11); 18:16. Open Access PDF.

·       Robertson DL, Babin LM, Krall JR, von Fricken ME, Baghi H, Jacobsen KH. The association between hunter-killed deer and Lyme disease in New Jersey, 2000-2014. EcoHealth. 2019 June; 16(2):330-337.

·       Koroma MM, Kamara MA, Keita N, Lokossou VL, Sundufu AJ, Jacobsen KH. Access to essential medications and equipment for obstetric and neonatal primary care in Bombali district, Sierra Leone. World Medical & Health Policy. 2019 Mar; 11(1):8-23.

·       Tao D, McGill B, Hamerly T, Kobayashi T, Khare P, Dziedzic A, Leski T, Holtz A, Shull B, Jedlicka AE, Walzer A, Slowey PD, Slowey CC, Nsango SE, Stenger D, Chaponda M, Mulenga M, Jacobsen KH, Sullivan DJ, Ryan SJ, Ansumana R, Moss WJ, Morlais I, Dinglasan RR. A saliva-based rapid test to quantify the infectious subclinical malaria parasite reservoir. Science Translational Medicine. 2019 Jan 2; 11(473):eaan4479. Open Access PDF.

·       Delamater PL, Street EJ, Leslie TF, Yang YT, Jacobsen KH. Complexity of the basic reproduction number (R0). Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2019 Jan; 25(1):1-4. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH. Pandemics. In: Juergensmeyer M, Steger MB, Sassen S, Faessel V, editors. Oxford Handbook of Global Studies. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 2018, p. 647-662.

·       Jacobsen KH. Globalization and the changing epidemiology of hepatitis A virus. Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine. 2018 Oct; 8(10):a031716. = In: Lemon SM, Walker CM, editors. Enteric Hepatitis Viruses. Cold Spring Harbor, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; 2018. p. 217-228. Open Access PDF.

·       Mulvaney SP, Fitzgerald LA, Hamdan LJ, Ringeisen BR, Petersen ER, Compton JR, McAuliff NL, Leski T, Taitt CR, Stenger DA, Myers CA, Hansen E, Ricketts M, Hoegberg C, Homdayjanakul K, Ansumana R, Lamin JM, Bangura U, Lahai J, Baio V, Limmathurotsakul D, Wongsuvan G, Hantrakun V, Wacharapluesadee S, Mungaomklang A, Putcharoen O, Yatoom P, Kruthakool K, Hontz R, Mores C, Siles C, Morrison A, Mayo M, Currie BM, Jacobsen KH, Quinn K, Blutman J, Amariei F, Hannan J. Rapid design and fielding of four diagnostic technologies in Sierra Leone, Thailand, Peru, and Australia: successes and challenges faced introducing these biosensors. Sensing and Bio-Sensing Research. 2018 Sept; 20:22-33. Open Access PDF.

·       Plaster AN, Painter JE, Tjersland DH, Jacobsen KH. University students' knowledge, attitudes, and sources of information about Zika virus. Journal of Community Health. 2018 Aug; 43(4):647-655.

·       Sinkala D, Fleming LC, Silwimba F, Jacobsen KH. Health services access for young children with sickle cell anaemia in the Chilubi district of Zambia. Medical Journal of Zambia. 2018 July-Sept; 45(3):134 -138.

·       Zook M, Wollersheim D, Erbas B, Jacobsen KH. Integrating spatial analysis into policy formulation: a case study examining traffic exposure and asthma. World Medical & Health Policy. 2018 Mar; 10(1):99-110.

·       Vraga E, Stefanidis A, Croitoru A, Crooks AT, Delamater PL, Lamprianidis G, Pfoser D, Radzikowski J, Jacobsen KH. Cancer and social media: a comparison of traffic about breast cancer, prostate cancer, and other reproductive cancers on Twitter and Instagram. Journal of Health Communication. 2018 Feb; 23(2):181-189.

·       Ansumana R, Dariano DF 3rd, Jacobsen KH, Leski TA, Lamin JM, Lahai J, Bangura U, Bockarie AS, Taitt C, Yasuda C, Bockarie MJ, Stenger DA. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in Bo, Sierra Leone, 2012-2013. BMC Research Notes. 2018 (Feb 8); 11:113. Open Access PDF.

·       AbuAlula NA, Milligan RA, Rodan MF, Jacobsen KH. Self-rated health among adolescents with type 1 diabetes in the T1D Exchange Clinic Registry. Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications. 2018 Jan; 32(1):83-88.

·       Vraga E, Radzikowski J, Stefanidis A, Croitoru A, Crooks AT, Delamater PL, Pfoser D, Jacobsen KH. Social media engagement with cancer awareness campaigns declined during the 2016 U.S. presidential election. World Medical & Health Policy. 2017 Dec; 9(4):456-465.

·       Ansumana R, Dariano DF 3rd, Jacobsen KH, Leski TA, Taitt C, Lamin JM, Lahai J, Bangura U, Bockarie AS, Yasuda C, Bockarie MJ, Stenger DA. Prevalence of markers of HIV infection among febrile adults and children in Bo, Sierra Leone, 2012-2013. BMC Research Notes. 2017 (Nov 6); 10:565. Open Access PDF.

·       Sundufu AJ, Bockarie CN, Jacobsen KH. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in urban Bo, Sierra Leone, and in the 16 countries of the West Africa region. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews. 2017 Oct; 33(7):e2904.

·       Dariano DF 3rd, Taitt CR, Jacobsen KH, Bangura U, Bockarie AS, Bockarie MJ, Lahai J, Lamin JM, Leski TA, Yasuda C, Stenger DA, Ansumana R. Surveillance of vector-borne infections (chikungunya, dengue, and malaria) in Bo, Sierra Leone, 2012-2013. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2017 Oct; 97(4):1151-1154. Open Access PDF.

·       Koroglu M, Jacobsen KH, Demiray T, Ozbek A, Erkorkmaz U, Altindis M. Socioeconomic indicators are strong predictors of hepatitis A seroprevalence rates in the Middle East and North Africa. Journal of Infection and Public Health. 2017 Sept-Oct; 10(5):513-517. Open Access PDF.

·       Van Effelterre TP, Guignard A, Marano C, Rojas R, Jacobsen KH. Modeling the hepatitis A epidemiological transition in Brazil and Mexico. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics. 2017 Aug; 13(8):1942-1951. Open Access PDF.

·       Mulwafu W, Chokotho L, Mkandawire N, Pandit H, Deckelbaum DL, Lavy CB, Jacobsen KH. Trauma care in Malawi: a call to action. Malawi Medical Journal. 2017 June; 29(2):198-202. Open Access PDF.

·       Chokotho L, Mulwafu W, Singini I, Njalale Y, Jacobsen KH. Improving hospital-based trauma care for road traffic injuries in Malawi. World Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2017 June; 8(2):85-90. Open Access PDF.

·       Itani T, Jacobsen KH, Kraemer A. Suicidal ideation and planning among Palestinian middle school students living in Gaza Strip, West Bank, and United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) camps. International Journal of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. 2017 June; 4(2):54-60. Open Access PDF.

·       Stefanidis A, Vraga E, Lamprianidis G, Radzikowski J, Delamater PL, Jacobsen KH, Pfoser D, Croitoru A, Crooks AT. Zika in Twitter: temporal variations of locations, actors, and concepts. JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (Journal of Medical Internet Research). 2017 (Apr 20); 3(2):e22. Open Access PDF.

·       Street EJ, Jacobsen KH. Prevalence of sports injuries among 13- to 15-year-old students in 25 low- and middle-income countries. Journal of Community Health. 2017 Apr; 42(2):295-302.

·       Oh KM, Taylor KL, Jacobsen KH. Breast cancer screening among Korean Americans: a systematic review. Journal of Community Health. 2017 Apr; 42(2):324-332.

·       Peyton RP, Ranasinghe S, Jacobsen KH. Injuries, violence, and bullying among middle school students in Oman. Oman Medical Journal. 2017 Mar; 32(2):98-105. Open Access PDF.

·       Ansumana R, Taitt C, Lamin JM, Jacobsen KH, Mulvaney SP, Leski T, Bangura U, Stenger D. Point-of-need diagnostics: biosurveillance with a device2cloud capability in Sierra Leone [abstract]. BMJ Global Health. 2017; 2(Suppl 2):A12. Open Access PDF.

·       Painter JE, Plaster AN, Tjersland DH, Jacobsen KH. Zika virus knowledge, attitudes, and vaccine interest among university students. Vaccine. 2017 Feb 7; 35(6):960-965.

·       Chokotho L, Mulwafu W, Singini I, Njalale Y, Maliwichi-Senganimalunje L, Jacobsen KH. First responders and prehospital care for road traffic injuries in Malawi. Prehospital and Disaster Medicine. 2017 Feb; 32(1):14-19.

·       Attaway DF, Waters NM, Geraghty EM, Jacobsen KH. Zika virus: endemic and epidemic ranges of Aedes mosquito transmission. Journal of Infection and Public Health. 2017 Jan-Feb; 10(1):120-123.

·       Zoker EM, Sundufu AJ, Jacobsen KH. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen in urban Bo, Sierra Leone. Tropical Journal of Medical Research. 2017 Jan-June; 20(1):41-44.

·       Poms LW, Jacobsen KH. Work-family conflict, stress, and physical and mental health: a model for understanding barriers to and opportunities for women's well-being at home and in the workplace. World Medical & Health Policy. 2016 Dec; 8(4):444-457.

·       Beck NI, Arif I, Paumier MF, Jacobsen KH. Adolescent injuries in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, and Uruguay: results from the 2012-2013 Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS). Injury. 2016 Dec; 47(12):2642-2649.

·       Street EJ, Jacobsen KH. Injury incidence among middle school students aged 13-15 years in 47 low-income and middle-income countries. Injury Prevention. 2016 Dec; 22(6):432-436.

·       Fleming LC, Ansumana R, Bockarie AS, Alejandre JD, Owen KK, Bangura U, Jimmy DH, Curtin KM, Stenger DA, Jacobsen KH. Health-care availability, preference, and distance for women in urban Bo, Sierra Leone. International Journal of Public Health. 2016 Dec; 61(9):1079-1088.

·       Leslie TF, Street EJ, Delamater PL, Yang YT, Jacobsen KH. Variation in vaccination data available at school entry across the United States. American Journal of Public Health. 2016 Dec; 106(12):2108-2182. Open Access PDF.

·       Hamukang'andu L, Fleming LC, Silwimba F, Jacobsen KH. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) for HIV among nursing students in Zambia. Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research. 2016 Dec; 8(2):1-8. Open Access PDF.

·       AbuAlula NA, Jacobsen KH, Milligan RA, Rodan MF, Conn VS. Evaluating diabetes educational interventions with a skill development component in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: a systematic review focusing on quality of life. The Diabetes Educator. 2016 Oct; 42(5):515-528.

·       Demiray T, Koroglu M, Jacobsen KH, Ozbek A, Terzi HA, Altindis M. Hepatitis A virus epidemiology in Turkey as universal childhood vaccination begins: seroprevalence and endemicity by region. The Turkish Journal of Pediatrics. 2016 Sept-Oct; 58(5):480-491. Open Access PDF.

·       Demiray T, Koroglu M, Jacobsen KH, Ozbek A, Terzi HA, Altindis M. Hepatitis A virus epidemiology in Turkey as childhood vaccination begins: seroprevalence and endemicity by region [abstract]. Journal of Clinical Virology. 2016 Sept; 82:S66.

·       Yang YT, Bhoobun S, Itani T, Jacobsen KH. Europe should consider mandatory measles immunization for school entry. Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. 2016 Sept; 5(3):319-322.

·       Chokotho L, Jacobsen KH, Burgess D, Labib M, Le G, Peter N, Lavy CBD, Pandit H. A review of existing trauma and musculoskeletal impairment (TMSI) care capacity in east, central, and southern Africa. Injury. 2016 Sept; 47(9):1990-1995. Open Access PDF.

·       Kastello JC, Gaffney KF, Jacobsen KH, Bullock LC, Sharps PW. Predictors of depression symptoms among low-income women exposed to perinatal intimate partner violence (IPV). Community Mental Health Journal. 2016 Aug; 52(6):683-690.

·       Kamara AS, Sundufu AJ, Jacobsen KH. Commercial drinking water quality and safety in Bo city, Sierra Leone. Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research. 2016 Aug; 8(1):26-36. Open Access PDF.

·       Ranasinghe S, Ramesh S, Jacobsen KH. Hygiene and mental health among middle school students in India and 11 other countries. Journal of Infection and Public Health. 2016 July-Aug; 9(4):429-435. Open Access PDF.

·       Delamater PL, Leslie TF, Yang YT, Jacobsen KH. An approach for estimating vaccination coverage for communities using school-level data and population mobility information. Applied Geography. 2016 June; 71:123-132. Open Access PDF.

·       Kastello JC, Jacobsen KH, Gaffney KF, Kodadek MP, Bullock LC, Sharps PW. Posttraumatic stress disorder among low-income women exposed to perinatal intimate partner violence. Archives of Women's Mental Health. 2016 June; 19(3):521-528.

·       Attaway DF, Jacobsen KH, Falconer A, Manca G, Waters NM. Risk analysis for dengue suitability in Africa using the ArcGIS Predictive Analysis Tool (PA Tools). Acta Tropica. 2016 June; 158:248-257.

·       Jacobsen KH, Skolnik RL, Martin G. The PRIDE (populations, research, interventions, diseases, exposures) model: a framework for defining global health [abstract]. Annals of Global Health. 2016 May-June; 82(3):425-426. Open Access PDF.

·       Denny VC, Cassese JS, Jacobsen KH. Non-fatal injury prevalence and risk factors among middle school students from four Polynesian countries: Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa, and Tonga. Injury. 2016 May; 47(5):1135-1142.

·       Nicholas DE, Delamater PL, Waters NM, Jacobsen KH. Geographically weighted discriminant analysis of environmental conditions associated with Rift Valley fever outbreaks in South Africa. Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology. 2016 May; 17:75-83.

·       Fleming LC, Ansumana R, Bockarie AS, Alejandre JD, Bangura U, Jimmy DH, Waters NM, Baghi H, Stenger DA, Jacobsen KH. Inpatient healthcare provider bypassing by women and their children in urban Bo, Sierra Leone. Pan African Medical Journal. 2016 (Mar 31); 23:146. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH, Aguirre AA, Bailey CL, Baranova A, Crooks AT, Croitoru A, Delamater PL, Gupta J, Kehn-Hall K, Narayanan A, Pierobon M, Rowan KE, Schwebach JR, Seshaiyer P, Sklarew DM, Stefanidis A, Agouris P. Lessons from the Ebola outbreak: action items for emerging infectious disease preparedness and response. EcoHealth. 2016 Mar; 13(1):200-212. Open Access PDF.

·       Van Effelterre TP, Marano C, Jacobsen KH. Modeling the hepatitis A epidemiological transition in Thailand. Vaccine. 2016 Jan 20; 34(4):555-562. Open Access PDF.

·       Radzikowski J, Stefanidis A, Jacobsen KH, Croitoru A, Crooks AT, Delamater PL. The measles vaccination narrative in Twitter: a quantitative analysis. JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (Journal of Medical Internet Research). 2016 (Jan 4); 2(1):e1. Open Access PDF.

·       Fleming LC, Jacobsen KH. EPIC: a framework for the factors that influence the selection of health-care providers. World Medical & Health Policy. 2015 Dec; 7(4):368-382.

·       Ranasinghe S, Ansumana R, Bockarie AS, Bangura U, Jimmy DH, Stenger DA, Jacobsen KH. Child bed net use before, during, and after a bed net distribution campaign in Bo, Sierra Leone. Malaria Journal. 2015 (Nov 18); 14:462. Open Access PDF.

·       Kastello JC, Gaffney KF, Jacobsen KH, Bullock LC, Sharps PW. Self-rated mental health: screening for depression and posttraumatic stress disorder among women exposed to perinatal intimate partner violence. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services. 2015 Nov; 53(11):32-38.

·       Hillson R, Alejandre JD, Jacobsen KH, Ansumana R, Bockarie AS, Bangura U, Lamin JM, Stenger DA. Stratified sampling of neighborhood sections for population estimation: a case study of Bo city, Sierra Leone. PLoS ONE. 2015 (July 15); 10(7):e0132850. Open Access PDF.

·       Leski TA, Ansumana R, Taitt CR, Lamin JM, Bangura U, Lahai J, Mbayo G, Kanneh MB, Bawo B, Bockarie AS, Scullion M, Phillips CL, Horner CP, Jacobsen KH, Stenger DA. Use of the FilmArrayTM system for detection of Zaire ebolavirus in a small hospital, Bo, Sierra Leone. Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 2015 July; 53(7):2368-2370. Open Access PDF.

·       McKittrick TR, Jacobsen KH. Oral hygiene and handwashing practices among middle school students in 15 Latin American and Caribbean countries. West Indian Medical Journal. 2015 June; 64(3):266-268. Open Access PDF.

·       Ranasinghe S, Ansumana R, Lamin JM, Bockarie AS, Bangura U, Buanie JAG, Stenger DA, Jacobsen KH. Herbs and herbal combinations used to treat suspected malaria in Bo, Sierra Leone. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 2015 May 26; 166:200-204.

·       Matute J, Lydick EA, Torres OR, Owen KK, Jacobsen KH. Prevalence of cleft lip and cleft palate in rural north-central Guatemala. Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal. 2015 May; 52(3):377-380.

·       Abdi H, Abdirahman HA, Jacobsen KH. Injuries and sport injuries among Argentinian students aged 13-15 years. International Sports Studies: Journal of the International Society for Comparative Physical Education and Sport. 2015 May; 37(1):16-26.

·       Chokotho L, Jacobsen KH, Burgess D, Labib M, Le G, Lavy CBD, Pandit H. Trauma and orthopaedic capacity of 267 hospitals in east, central, and southern Africa [abstract]. The Lancet. 2015 Apr 27; 385:S17. Open Access PDF.

·       Ranasinghe S, Ansumana R, Lamin JM, Bockarie AS, Bangura U, Buanie JAG, Stenger DA, Jacobsen KH. Attitudes toward home-based malaria testing in rural and urban Sierra Leone. Malaria Journal. 2015 (Feb 15); 14:80. Open Access PDF.

·       Ansumana R, Jacobsen KH, Idris M, Bangura H, Boie-Jalloh M, Lamin JM, Sesay S, Sahr F. Ebola in Freetown area, Sierra Leone: a case study of 581 patients. New England Journal of Medicine. 2015 Feb 5; 372(6):587-588. Open Access PDF.

·       Sundufu AJ, Ansumana R, Bockarie AS, Bangura U, Lamin JM, Jacobsen KH, Stenger DA. Syndromic surveillance of peste des petits ruminants and other animal diseases in Koinadugu District, Sierra Leone, 2011-2012. Tropical Animal Health and Production. 2015 Feb; 47(2):473-477.

·       McClanahan M, McCoy SM, Jacobsen KH. Forms of bullying reported by middle-school students in Latin America and the Caribbean. Advances in School Mental Health Promotion. 2015 Jan; 8(1):42-54.

·       Chokotho L, Mulwafu W, Jacobsen KH, Pandit H, Lavy C. The burden of trauma in four rural district hospitals in Malawi: a retrospective review of medical records. Injury. 2014 Dec; 45(12):2065-2070.

·       Nicholas DE, Jacobsen KH, Waters NM. Risk factors associated with human Rift Valley fever infection: systematic review and meta-analysis. Tropical Medicine & International Health. 2014 Dec; 19(12):1420-1429. Open Access PDF.

·       Hillson R, Alejandre JD, Jacobsen KH, Ansumana R, Bockarie AS, Bangura U, Lamin JM, Malanoski AP, Stenger DA. Methods for determining the uncertainty of population estimates derived from satellite imagery and limited survey data: a case study of Bo city, Sierra Leone. PLoS One. 2014 (Nov 14); 9(11):e112241. Open Access PDF.

·       Attaway DF, Jacobsen KH, Falconer A, Manca G, Bennett LR, Waters NM. Mosquito habitat and dengue risk potential in Kenya: alternative methods to traditional risk mapping techniques. Geospatial Health. 2014 Nov; 9(1):119-130. Open Access PDF.

·       Itani T, Jacobsen KH, Nguyen T, Wiktor SZ. A new method for imputing country-level estimates of hepatitis A virus endemicity levels in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Vaccine. 2014 Oct 21; 32(46):6067-6074.

·       Ansumana R, Jacobsen KH, Bockarie MJ, Stenger DA. Point-of-care tests: Where is the point? [letter]. Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2014 Oct; 14(10):922-923. Open Access PDF.

·       Hasumi T, Jacobsen KH. Healthcare service problems reported in a national survey of South Africans. International Journal for Quality in Health Care. 2014 Aug; 26(4):482-489. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH. Hepatitis A virus in West Africa: is an epidemiological transition beginning? Nigerian Medical Journal. 2014 July-Aug; 55(4):279-284. Open Access PDF.

·       Ansumana R, Bonwitt J, Stenger DA, Jacobsen KH. Ebola in Sierra Leone: a call for action. The Lancet. 2014 July 26; 384(9940):303. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH, Hasumi T. Satisfaction with healthcare services in South Africa: results the national 2010 General Household Survey. Pan African Medical Journal. 2014 (June 22); 18:172. Open Access PDF.

·       McKittrick TR, Jacobsen KH. Oral hygiene practices among middle-school students in 44 low- and middle-income countries. International Dental Journal. 2014 June; 64(3):164-170.

·       Dome M, Ansumana R, Covington AL, Rebollo M, Sesay S, Jacobsen KH, de Souza DK, Koudou BG, Michael E, Bockarie MJ. Lymphedema in a 7-year-old boy infected with Wuchereria bancrofti in Sierra Leone: a case report. Acta Tropica. 2014 June; 134:13-16. Open Access PDF.

·       Bhoobun S, Jetty A, Koroma MA, Kamara MJ, Kabia M, Coulson R, Ansumana R, Jacobsen KH. Facilitators and barriers related to voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) for HIV among young adults in Bo, Sierra Leone. Journal of Community Health. 2014 June; 39(3):514-520.

·       Attaway DF, Jacobsen KH, Falconer A, Manca G, Waters NM. Assessing the methods needed for improved dengue mapping: a SWOT analysis. Pan African Medical Journal. 2014 (Apr 16); 17:289. Open Access PDF.

·       Seibert DJ, Speroni KG, Oh KM, Devoe MC, Jacobsen KH. Preventing transmission of MRSA: a qualitative study of health care workers' attitudes and suggestions. American Journal of Infection Control. 2014 Apr; 42(4):405-411.

·       Oh KM, Jacobsen KH. Colorectal cancer screening among Korean Americans: a systematic review. Journal of Community Health. 2014 Apr; 39(2):193-200.

·       Seibert DJ, Speroni KG, Oh KM, Devoe MC, Jacobsen KH. Knowledge, perceptions, and practices of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission prevention among health care workers in acute-care settings. American Journal of Infection Control. 2014 Mar; 42(3):254-259.

·       Ansumana R, Jacobsen KH, Leski TA, Covington AL, Bangura U, Hodges MH, Lin B, Bockarie MJ, Stenger DA. Reemergence of chikungunya virus in Bo, Sierra Leone. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2013 July; 19(7):1108-1110. Open Access PDF.

·       Ansumana R, Bockarie AS, Sankoh P, Jacobsen KH, Koroma AB, Malanoski AP, Meehan KA, Leski T, Jimmy DH, Bangura U, Sahr F, Lin B, Stenger DA. The use of mobile electronic devices for public health data collection and syndromic surveillance at the Republic of Sierra Leone Armed Forces. Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research. 2013 June; 5(1):9-14. Open Access PDF.

·       Ansumana R, Jacobsen KH, Gbakima AA, Hodges MH, Lamin JM, Leski TA, Malanoski AP, Lin B, Bockarie MJ, Stenger DA. Presumptive self-diagnosis of malaria and other febrile illnesses in Sierra Leone. Pan African Medical Journal. 2013 (May 26); 15:34. Open Access PDF.

·       Abdirahman HA, Fleming LC, Jacobsen KH. Parental involvement and bullying among middle-school students in North Africa. Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal. 2013 Mar; 19(3):227-233. Open Access PDF.

·       Pierobon M, Barak M, Hazrati S, Jacobsen KH. Alcohol consumption and violence among Argentine adolescents = Consumo de alcool e violencia entre adolescentes argentinos. Jornal de Pediatria. 2013 Jan-Feb; 89(1):100-107. Open Access PDF. PDF in Portuguese.

·       Jimmy DH, Sundufu AJ, Malanoski AP, Jacobsen KH, Ansumana R, Leski TA, Bangura U, Bockarie AS, Tejan E, Lin B, Stenger DA. Water quality associated public health risk in Bo, Sierra Leone. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment. 2013 Jan; 185(1):241-251.

·       Jacobsen KH, Ansumana R, Abdirahman HA, Bockarie AS, Bangura U, Meehan KA, Jimmy DH, Malanoski AP, Sundufu AJ, Stenger DA. Considerations in the selection of healthcare providers for mothers and children in Bo, Sierra Leone: reputation, cost, and location. International Health. 2012 Dec; 4(4):307-313.

·       Bhoobun S, Jalloh AA, Jacobsen KH. Cerebral venous thrombosis in a child with nephrotic syndrome: case report. Pan African Medical Journal. 2012 (Nov 19); 35:57. Open Access PDF.

·       Hasumi T, Ahsan F, Couper CM, Aguayo JL, Jacobsen KH. Parental involvement and mental well-being of Indian adolescents. Indian Pediatrics. 2012 Nov; 49(11):915-918. Open Access PDF.

·       Hasumi T, Jacobsen KH. Hypertension in South African adults: results of a nationwide survey. Journal of Hypertension. 2012 Nov; 30(11):2098-2104.

·       Adbirahman HA, Bah TT, Shrestha HL, Jacobsen KH. Bullying, mental health, and parental involvement among adolescents in the Caribbean. West Indian Medical Journal. 2012 Oct; 61(5):504-508. Open Access PDF.

·       Tammariello AE, Gallahue NK, Ellard KA, Woldesemait N, Jacobsen KH. Parental involvement and mental health among Thai adolescents. Advances in School Mental Health Promotion. 2012 Oct; 5(4):236-245.

·       Jacobsen KH. Introduction to health research methods. Syllabus. 2012; 1(2). Open Access PDF.

·       Poms LW, Fleming LC, Jacobsen KH. Parental involvement and tobacco use among middle-school students in low- and middle-income countries. Journal of School Health. 2012 Aug; 82(8):353-363.

·       Jacobsen KH, Abdirahman HA, Ansumana R, Bockarie AS, Bangura U, Jimmy DH, Malanoski AP, Sundufu AJ, Stenger DA. Home birth and hospital birth trends in Bo, Sierra Leone. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica. 2012 June; 91(6):750-753.

·       Jacobsen KH. Health transitions and environmental change in contemporary Africa. In: Falola T, Brownell E, editors. Landscape, Environment and Technology in Colonial and Postcolonial Africa. New York: Routledge; 2012, p. 291-310.

·       Howard AL, Jacobsen KH, Komwa MK, Yohane R. Household market participation and stunting in preschool children in Lilongwe, Malawi. South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2011 Dec; 24(4):202-204. Open Access PDF.

·       Mohd Hanafiah K, Jacobsen KH, Wiersma ST. Challenges to mapping the health risk of hepatitis A virus infection. International Journal of Health Geographics. 2011 (Oct 18); 10:57. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH. A taxonomy of bias in systematic reviews [abstract]. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. 2011 Aug; 65 (suppl 1):A116-A117.

·       Jacobsen KH. Research ethics: principles, practices, and reporting. World Medical & Health Policy. 2011 May; 3(2):4.

·       Meehan KA, Bankoski AJ, Tejan E, Ansumana R, Bangura U, Stenger DA, Jacobsen KH. Hypertension in Bo, Sierra Leone. Ethnicity & Disease. 2011 Spring; 21(2):237-242,259.

·       Chang AC, Jacobsen KH, Lin KW, Teng LJ. 台灣護理人員在腸病毒方面的知識和預防 = Enterovirus knowledge and handwashing practices among nurses in a hospital in Taipei, Taiwan. 疫情報導 = Taiwan Epidemiology Bulletin. 2011 Mar 22; 27(6):60-67,81-91. Open Access PDF. PDF in Chinese.

·       Chau CN, Jacobsen KH, Ngoc VB. Maternal reports of child health practices in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Journal of Rural and Tropical Public Health (continues as Rural and Remote Health) 2011; 10:15-20. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen GD, Jacobsen KH. Health awareness campaigns and diagnosis rates: evidence from National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Journal of Health Economics. 2011 Jan; 30(1):55-61. PDF of working paper.

·       Chau CN, Jacobsen KH, Ngoc VB. Dengue prevention in southern Vietnam [letter]. International Health. 2010 Dec; 2(4):287-288.

·       Fan LY, Jacobsen KH. Risk factors for hyperemesis gravidarum. Current Women's Health Reviews. 2010 Nov; 6(4):309-317.

·       Ansumana R, Malanoski AP, Bockarie AS, Sundufu AJ, Jimmy DH, Bangura U, Jacobsen KH, Lin B, Stenger DA. Enabling methods for community health mapping in developing countries. International Journal of Health Geographics. 2010 (Oct 29); 9:56. Open Access PDF.

·       Bankoski AJ, Jacobsen KH, Pawloski LR, Moore JB, Gaffney KF, Jaimovich S, Campos MC. Relationship between reported dietary practices of Chilean children and their parents' preferences for their consumption. Revista Chilena de Nutricion. 2010 Sep; 37(3):352-358. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH, Wiersma ST. Hepatitis A virus seroprevalence by age and world region, 1990 and 2005. Vaccine. 2010 Sep 24; 28(41):6653-6657. Note: In Table 2, the years are reversed. The rows for "1990" are actually for 2005 and the rows for "2005" are actually for 1990. In nearly every world region, seroprevalence rates decreased between 1990 and 2005.

·       Jacobsen KH, Bankoski AJ. Predictors of compliance with scheduled surgery in rural Guatemala. International Health. 2010 Sep; 2(3):206-211.

·       Jacobsen KH, Padgett JJ. Risk factors for Mycobacterium ulcerans infection. International Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2010 Aug; 14(8):e677-e681. Open Access PDF.

·       Owen KK, Obregon EJ, Jacobsen KH. A geographic analysis of access to health services in rural Guatemala. International Health. 2010 June; 2(2):143-149.

·       Jacobsen KH, Fleming LC, Ribeiro PS. Pyomyositis in Amazonian Ecuador. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2010 June; 104(6):438-439.

·       Fleming LC, Jacobsen KH. Bullying among middle-school students in low and middle income countries. Health Promotion International. 2010 Mar; 25(1):73-84. Open Access PDF.

·       Komwa MK, Jacobsen KH, Parker DC. HIV/AIDS-associated beliefs and practices relating to diet and work in southeastern Uganda. Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition. 2010 Feb; 28(1):76-85. Open Access PDF.

·       Downes BL, Jacobsen KH. A systematic review of the epidemiology of mansonelliasis. African Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2010; 4(1):7-14. Open Access PDF.

·       Chubb MC, Jacobsen KH. Mathematical modeling and the epidemiological research process. European Journal of Epidemiology. 2010 Jan; 25(1):13-19.

·       Parker DC, Jacobsen KH, Komwa MK. A qualitative study of the impact of HIV/AIDS on agricultural households in southeastern Uganda. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2009 Aug; 6(8):2113-2138. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH. Patterns of co-authorship in international epidemiology. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. 2009 Aug; 63(8):665-669.

·       Manock SR, Jacobsen KH, Brito de Bravo N, Russell KL, Negrete M, Olson JG, Sanchez JL, Blair P, Smalligan RD, Quist BK, Freire Espin J, Espinoza WR, MacCormick F, Fleming LC, Kochel T. Etiology of acute undifferentiated febrile illness in the Amazon basin of Ecuador. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2009 July; 81(1):146-151. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH. The Global Prevalence of Hepatitis A Virus Infection and Susceptibility: A Systematic Review. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2009 June, 428 p. Report No.: WHO/IVB/10.01. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH. Reporting of ethics-related methods in epidemiological research. Journal of Medical Ethics. 2009 Apr; 35(4):262-267.

·       Fleming LC, Jacobsen KH. Bullying and symptoms of depression in Chilean middle-school students. Journal of School Health. 2009 Mar; 79(3):130-137.

·       Yang L, Jacobsen KH. A systematic review of the association between breastfeeding and breast cancer. Journal of Women's Health. 2008 Dec; 17(10):1635-1645.

·       Padgett JJ, Jacobsen KH. Loiasis: African eye worm. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2008 Oct; 102(10):983-989.

·       Jacobsen KH, Ribeiro PS, Quist BK, Rydbeck BV. Prevalence of intestinal parasites in young Quichua children in the highlands of rural Ecuador. Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition. 2007 Dec; 25(4):399-405. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH. Migration and health in Africa and the African Diaspora. In: Falola T, Afolabi N, editors. The Human Cost of African Migrations. New York: Routledge; 2007, p. 19-35.

·       Jacobsen KH, Van Dyke MK. Development and the epidemiologic transition in sub-Saharan Africa. In: Falola T, Heaton MM, editors. HIV/AIDS, Illness, and African Well-being. Rochester NY: University of Rochester Press; 2007, p. 182-198.

·       Jacobsen KH, Koopman JS. The effects of socioeconomic development on worldwide hepatitis A virus seroprevalence patterns. International Journal of Epidemiology. 2005 June; 34(3):600-609. Open Access PDF.

·       Jacobsen KH, Koopman JS. Declining hepatitis A seroprevalence: a global review and analysis. Epidemiology & Infection. 2004 Dec; 132(6):1005-1022. Open Access PDF.

·       Zhu K, Beiler J, Hunter S, Payne-Wilks K, Roland CL, Forbes DS, Chinchilli V, Bernard LJ, Jacobsen KH, Levine RS. The relationship between menstrual factors and breast cancer according to estrogen receptor status of tumor: a case-control study in African-American women. Ethnicity & Disease. 2002 Fall; 12(S3):23-29. Open Access PDF.

 

 

 

Global Burden of Disease (GBD)

 

Title: IHME GBD logoClick here to access GBD articles in The LancetThe GBD project is a massive international collaboration of hundreds of coinvestigators led by the Institute for Health Metrics & Evaluation (IHME). The GBD team generates frequent updates of country-specific, regional, and global estimates of life expectancy, mortality, morbidity, disability, and exposure to risk factors. Visit the IHME website to interact with fascinating visualizations of global health data.

 

Jacobsen GBD collaborative publications

·       GBD 2019 Demographics Collaborators (Wang H, et al.). Global age-sex-specific fertility, mortality, healthy life expectancy (HALE), and population estimates in 204 countries and territories, 1950-2019: a comprehensive demographic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. The Lancet. 2020 Oct 17; 396(10258):1160-1203. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2019 Diseases and Injuries Collaborators (Vos T, et al.). Global burden of 369 diseases and injuries in 204 countries and territories, 1990-2019: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. The Lancet. 2020 Oct 17; 396(10258):1204-1222. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2019 Risk Factor Collaborators (Murray CJL, et al.). Global burden of 87 risk factors in 204 countries and territories, 1990-2019: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. The Lancet. 2020 Oct 17; 396(10258):1223-1249. Open Access PDF.

·       James SL, Castle CD, Dingels ZV, ..., ..., Jacobsen KH, ..., ..., Vos T. Global injury morbidity and mortality from 1990 to 2017: results from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. Injury Prevention. 2020 Oct; 26(Suppl 1):i96-114. Open Access PDF.

·       Haagsma JA, James SL, Castle CD, ..., ..., Jacobsen KH, ..., ..., Vos T. Burden of injury along the development spectrum: associations between the Socio-demographic Index and disability-adjusted life year estimates from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. Injury Prevention. 2020 Oct; 26(Suppl 1):i12-26. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2017 HIV Collaborators (Frank TD, et al.). Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and mortality of HIV, 1980-2017, and forecasts to 2030, for 195 countries and territories: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2017. The Lancet HIV. 2019 Dec; 6(12):e831-859. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2017 Child and Adolescent Health Collaborators (Reiner RC Jr, et al.). Diseases, injuries, and risk factors in child and adolescent health, 1990 to 2017: findings from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors 2017 Study. JAMA Pediatrics. 2019 June; 173(6):e190337. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD Tuberculosis Collaborators (Murray CJL, et al.). Global, regional, and national burden of tuberculosis, 1990-2016: results from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors 2016 Study. Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2018 Dec; 18(12):1329-1349. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2017 Cause of Death Collaborators (Roth GA, et al.). Global, regional, and national age-sex-specific mortality for 282 causes of death in 195 countries and territories, 1980-2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. The Lancet. 2018 Nov 10; 392(10158):1736-1788. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2017 Disease and Injury Incidence and Prevalence Collaborators (James SL, et al.). Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 354 diseases and injuries for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. The Lancet. 2018 Nov 10; 392(10159):1789-1858. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2017 DALYs and HALE Collaborators (Kyu HH, et al.). Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 359 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. The Lancet. 2018 Nov 10; 392(10158):1859-1922. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2017 Risk Factor Collaborators (Stanaway JD, et al.). Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 84 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. The Lancet. 2018 Nov 10; 392(10159):1923-1994. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2017 SDG Collaborators (Lozano R, et al.). Measuring progress and projecting attainment to 2030 of the health-related Sustainable Development Goals in 195 countries and territories: an analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. The Lancet. 2018 Nov 10; 392(10159):2091-2138. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2016 Healthcare Access and Quality Collaborators (Fullman N, et al.). Measuring performance on the Healthcare Access and Quality Index for 195 countries and territories and selected subnational locations: a systematic analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. The Lancet. 2018 June 2; 391(10136):2236-2271. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2015 Eastern Mediterranean Region Transportation Injuries Collaborators (Mokdad AH, et al.). Transport injuries and deaths in the Eastern Mediterranean Region: findings from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study. International Journal of Public Health. 2018 May; 63(Suppl 1):187-198. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD Tuberculosis Collaborators (Kyu HH, et al.). The global burden of tuberculosis: results from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2018 Mar; 18(3):261-284. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2016 Mortality Collaborators (Wang H, et al.). Global, regional, and national under-5 mortality, adult mortality, age-specific mortality, and life expectancy, 1970-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. The Lancet. 2017 Sept 16; 390(10100):1084-1150. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2016 Causes of Death Collaborators (Naghavi M, et al.). Global, regional, and national age-sex specific mortality for 264 causes of death, 1980-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. The Lancet. 2017 Sept 16; 390(10100):1151-1210. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2016 Disease and Injury Incidence and Prevalence Collaborators (Vos T, et al.). Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 328 diseases and injuries for 195 countries, 1990-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. The Lancet. 2017 Sept 16; 390(10100):1211-1259. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2016 DALYs and HALE Collaborators (Hay SI, et al.). Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 333 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. The Lancet. 2017 Sept 16; 390(10100):1260-1344. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2016 Risk Factors Collaborators (Gakidou E, et al.). Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 84 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks, 1990-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. The Lancet. 2017 Sept 16; 390(10100):1345-1422. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2016 SDG Collaborators (Fullman N, et al.). Measuring progress and projecting attainment on the basis of past trends of the health-related Sustainable Development Goals in 188 countries: an analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. The Lancet. 2017 Sept 16; 390(10100):1423-1459. Open Access PDF.

·       Roth GA, ..., ..., Jacobsen KH, ..., ..., Murray CJL. Global, regional, and national burden of cardiovascular diseases for 10 causes, 1990 to 2015. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2017 July 4; 70(1):1-25. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD Child and Adolescent Health Collaboration (Kassebaum NJ, et al.). Child and adolescent health from 1990 to 2015: findings from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors 2015 Study. JAMA Pediatrics. 2017 June; 171(6):573-592. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD Mortality and Causes of Death Collaborators (Wang H, et al.). Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. The Lancet. 2016 Oct 8; 388(10053):1459-1544. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2015 Disease and Injury Incidence and Prevalence Collaborators (Vos T, et al.). Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. The Lancet. 2016 Oct 8; 388(10053):1545-1602. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2015 DALYs and HALE Collaborators (Kassebaum NJ, et al.). Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 315 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE), 1990-2015: a systematic for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. The Lancet. 2016 Oct 8; 388(10053):1603-1658. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2015 Risk Factors Collaborators (Forouzanfar MH, et al.). Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks, 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. The Lancet. 2016 Oct 8; 388(10053):1659-1724. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2015 Child Mortality Collaborators (Wang H, et al.). Global, regional, national, and selected subnational levels of stillbirths, neonatal, infant, and under-5 mortality, 1980-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. The Lancet. 2016 Oct 8; 388(10053):1725-1774. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2015 Maternal Mortality Collaborators (Kassebaum NJ, et al.). Global, regional, and national levels of maternal mortality, 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 Study. The Lancet. 2016 Oct 8; 388(10053):1775-1812. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2015 SDG Collaborators (Lim SS, et al.). Measuring the health-related Sustainable Development Goals in 188 countries: a baseline analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. The Lancet. 2016 Oct 8; 388(10053):1813-1850. Open Access PDF.

·       Stanaway JD, Flaxman AD, Naghavi M, Fitzmaurice C, Vos T, Abubakar I, Abu-Raddad LJ, Assadi R, Bhala N, Cowie B, Forouzanfour MH, Groeger J, Hanafiah KM, Jacobsen KH, James SL, MacLachlan J, Malekzadeh R, Martin NK, Mokdad AH, Murray CJ, Plass D, Rana S, Rein DB, Richardus JH, Sanabria J, Saylan M, Shahraz S, So S, Vlassov VV, Weiderpass E, Wiersma ST, Younis M, Yu C, El Sayed Zaki M, Cooke GS. The global burden of viral hepatitis from 1990 to 2013: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. The Lancet. 2016 Sept 10; 388(10049):1081-1088. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2015 HIV Collaborators (Wang H, et al.). Estimates of global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and mortality of HIV, 1980-2015: the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. The Lancet HIV. 2016 Aug; 3(8):e361-e387. Open Access PDF.

·       Global Burden of Diseases Pediatrics Collaboration (Kyu HH, et al.). Global and national burden of diseases and injuries among children and adolescents between 1990 and 2013: findings from the Global Burden of Disease 2013 Study. JAMA Pediatrics. 2016 Mar; 170(3):267-287. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2013 Risk Factor Collaborators (Forouzanfar MH, et al.). Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks in 188 countries 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. The Lancet. 2015 Dec 5; 386(10010):2287-2323. Open Access PDF.

·       GBD 2013 DALYs and HALE Collaborators (Murray CJL, et al.). Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for 306 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 188 countries, 1990-2013: quantifying the epidemiological transition. The Lancet. 2015 Nov 28; 386(10009):2145-2191. Open Access PDF.

·       Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 Collaborators (Vos T, et al.). Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability in 301 acute and chronic diseases and injuries for 188 countries, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. The Lancet. 2015 Aug 22; 386(9995):743-800. Open Access PDF.

·       The Global Burden of Disease Cancer Collaborators (Fitzmaurice C, et al.). The global burden of cancer 2013. JAMA Oncology. 2015 July; 1(4):505-527. Open Access PDF.

·       Chen A, Jacobsen KH, Deshmukh AA, Cantor SB. The evolution of the disability-adjusted life year (DALY). Socio-Economic Planning Sciences. 2015 Mar; 49(1):10-15.

·       GBD 2013 Mortality and Causes of Death Collaborators (Naghavi M, et al.). Global, regional, and national age-sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. The Lancet. 2015 Jan 10; 385(9963):117-171. Open Access PDF.

·       Kassebaum NJ, ..., ..., Jacobsen KH, ..., ..., Lozano R. Global, regional, and national levels and causes of maternal mortality during 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. The Lancet. 2014 Sept 13; 384(9947):980-1004. Open Access PDF.

·       Murray CJL, ..., ..., Jacobsen KH, ..., ..., Vos T. Global, regional, and national incidence and mortality for HIV, tuberculosis and malaria, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. The Lancet. 2014 Sept 13; 384(9947):1005-1070. Open Access PDF.

·       U.S. Burden of Disease Collaborators (Murray CJL, et al.). The state of U.S. health, 1990-2010: burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association. 2013 Aug 14; 310(6):591-608. Open Access PDF.

·       Lozano R, ..., ..., Jacobsen KH, ..., ..., Murray CJL. Global and regional mortality from 235 causes of death for 20 age groups in 1990 and 2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. The Lancet. 2012 Dec 15; 380(9859):2095-2128.

·       Vos M, ..., ..., Jacobsen KH, ..., ..., Murray CJL. Years lived with disability (YLDs) for 1160 sequelae of 289 diseases and injuries 1990-2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. The Lancet. 2012 Dec 15; 380(9859):2163-2196. Open Access PDF.

·       Murray CJL, ..., ..., Jacobsen KH, ..., ..., Lopez AD. Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for 291 diseases and injuries in 21 regions, 1990-2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. The Lancet. 2012 Dec 15; 380(9859):2197-2223.

·       Ribeiro PS, Jacobsen KH, Mathers CD, Garcia Moreno C. Priorities for women's health from the Global Burden of Disease study. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics. 2008 July; 102(1):82-90.

 

 

Last Updated: 21 Nov 2020