ENGLISH 302-N44, CRN 23417
ENGLISH 403-N47, CRN 23420


Advanced Composition

Spring 2021


Prof. Joyce Johnston
Dept. of English

jjohnsto@gmu.edu

Office Hours: Tuesdays 10:30-noon
Skype: joyce.johnston48

WhatsApp or voice: 703.447.6460





This online section of English 302 uses Blackboard as course software.  Access Blackboard at http://mymasonportal.gmu.edu.  After logging in using your MasonLive user ID and password, click on the Courses tab at the upper right of the screen.  Then click on the course name to access the Blackboard course folder.

A week begins on Monday and ends on Sunday. Assignments are due by 11:59 PM EST on the dates listed.

Both the Couse Description and the Course Schedule can also be accessed on Professor Johnston's website, available at https://mason.gmu.edu/~jjohnsto



 

COURSE SCHEDULE

CLICKABLE MENU


           

 


Week 1

Jan 25-31
Creating an Academic  Community



 

Weeks 2-4

Feb. 1-21

Analyzing Academic Discourse




 

Weeks 5-6

Feb. 22-March 7
Writing

for the Public




Week 7-8

March 8-21
Conferencing and Researching Ethically


 

Week 9-10

March 22-April 4

Annotating Research Sources




Weeks
11-13

April 5-25

Researching

in a Discipline




Weeks 14-15

April 26-May 16




 




CREATING AN ACADEMIC COMMUNITY



WEEK 1:    JAN 25-31

AUG. 24: FIRST DAY OF FALL SEMESTER CLASSES

CONTENT FOCUS: CIVILITY
 
WRITING FOCUS: BLOGGING

This module explores the challenges of communicating civilly and professionally with other business students and the instructor. The goal is to achieve authentic expression while discussing sometimes difficult topics. The class will establish its own norms of acceptable online behavior for the rest of the semester.


READINGS ACTIVITIES DUE DATES FOR ASSSIGNMENTS


DAY 1 AND BEFORE:


You should have received a Welcome email from the professor in the week before classes started.  You also received an email message to the class on Day 1 which has two important attachments.  If you did not receive either or both, contact the professor immediately to get them.  Email Prof. Johnston at jjohnsto@gmu.edu



Getting Started:


In the Course Menu on the left, click on the second item from the top, Orientation to Our Blackboard Home Page. If the screencast does not start immediately, click to advance the slides.



BEFORE YOU DO ANYTHING ELSE, be sure to watch two important screencasts:

  1. Why Take English 302 to understand why every student at George Mason is required to take our course and what you can expect to gain from it.
  2. the Orientation screencast so you will know how to find the materials and functions you need for our course in Blackboard.  Then click around to make sure you are comfortable accessing materials and resources on your own.


Watch on Monday, Jan. 25, or as soon as you register for the course.


The big picture by a famous philosopher:


Why Civility Is Necessary For Society's Survival by P. M. Forni.

(If the link fails, Google the name of the article in The Dallas Morning News.)



Establish your class presence by creating or updating your profile in on Blackboard. (Remember that the profile you create will appear in all of your Blackboard course folders.) Go to our course menu on the left side of the screen. Under the Academic Resources for Students heading, click Blackboard Help for Students, then "Creating a Blackboard Profile."




The  special challenges of communicating online:


Online Civility and Its (Muppethugging) Discontents by Sheril Kirshenbaum



Before beginning our Class Civility Blog, check the Scoring Rubric to understand the criteria you will be graded on.  It is available under Instructions for Assignments in the course menu. Click on the folder for Creating an Academic Community





Participate in our Class Civility Blog, found under Communication in the course menu. Read the directions at the top to access the questions.  Post your responses as COMMENTS in response to the instructor's posts to the TWO REQUIRED QUESTIONS (#1 AND #2)





Posting your blog entries:

If you have not used the Blackboard blog function previously, go to our Blackboard Course menu on the left side of the screen. Under the Academic Resources for Students heading, click Blackboard Help for Profiles and Functions, then "Videos for Common Blackboard Functions."  At the very end of the file, watch the video on "Creating a Blog Entry" (3:24)


POST RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS #1 AND #2  by Thursday, Jan. 28,  by 11:59 PM


The instructorís point of view:


Dont Email me This Way, by Ms. Mentor



Continuing with our blog, choose and respond to TWO of the five remaining questions (#3-#7) Select the two that allow you to contribute to the exchange of ideas in the most insightful and thoughtful fashion.

POST 2 BLOG ENTRIES by Friday, Jan. 29, by 11:59 PM


Dealing with communication problems:


Conflict in Cyberspace: How to Resolve Conflict Online, by John Suler



Complete the Essentials of Class Interaction SURVEY to establish our class code of behavior  It is available under Instructions for Assignments in the course menu. Click on the folder Creating an Academic Community After everyone has expressed his/her opinion, you will receive an email the next week containing the class consensus on best practices online.



POST  RESPONSE TO SURVEY  by Sunday, Jan. 31, by 11:59 PM


Actively promoting digital civility:

Microsoft's Council for Digital Good Calls on US Policymakers to Promote Digital Civility by Jacqueline Beauchere

Text of the Council's Open Letter



Learn your classmates' preferences for a civil atmosphere in our class by reviewing the results of the Essentials of Class Interaction Survey in a class email on Sunday, Sept. 2. Compare to the behaviors stressed by the Council.







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ANALYZING ACADEMIC DISCOURSE


WEEK 2:   FEB. 1-7


FEB. 1:  LAST DAY TO ADD CLASSES


CONTENT FOCUS: CONVENTIONS OF ACADEMIC WRITING AS A GENRE, APPROPRIATE DOCUMENTATION FORMAT


WRITING FOCUS: CONVENTIONS OF VOCABULARY AND PHRASING, TONE, COMPARISON AND CONTRAST


This module offers training in locating, readings and analyzing a recently published scholarly article in the student'sacademic discipline. Results will be presented ias a critical analysis. Valid online sources for the memo will appear in correct APA format used by the School of Business.


READINGS

ACTIVITIES

DUE DATES FOR ASSIGNMENTS


In the course folder in Blackboard, go to Course Overview, the top category in the Course Menu. Click on Surviving and Thriving in English 302.  Click Slide Show,  then From Beginning so the audio will play as the presentation advances itself.


Starting with the positive atmosphere established in Week 1, add ten ideas for academic and person success in this course.



Show that you understand the formal structure of our classroom community by completing the Quiz on Course Policies.  It is available under Instructions for Assignments in the course menu. Click on the folder Characterizing an Academic Community.


UPLOAD QUIZ ON COURSE POLICIES by returning to the instructions file for the quiz.

 If unsure how to submit, watch Submit an Assignment (Student)   (0:56) Submit 
by Wednesday, Feb. 3, by 11:59 PM



Assigment requirements:

Instructions for Analyzing Academic Discourse, found in the folder by the same name under Instructions for Assignments and its accompanying Scoring Rubric


Get an overview of the requirements and goals for the Analysis essay.The skills from this assignment will be used in the Research Paper, both for this class, and for research projects in other classes.


Understanding academic discourse in your career or major:

What is a Discourse Community?

o     Scroll far down the page to Related WiseGEEK Articles

 Read What is the Relationship Between Language and Discourse?

 Read What are the Different Types of Academic Discourse?

 Read What is Scientific Discourse? if you are a science major



Focus on the differences between academic writing  and other professional writing tasks and styles.  The focus is on understanding and critiquing empirical research as reported in scholarly journals (a highly specialized genre that is the pinnacle in publishing success for academic writers.)


Understand discourse communities in action:



Use these examples to influence your own style and approach.


 


Essental features of discourse communities:

Engh 1102 Discourse Community Introduction (3:38)

Swales' Six Characteristics of Discourse Communities


Watch video before starting the worksheet. 
Download and complete the worksheet on "What is Your Academic Discipline?" available in Blackboard under Instructions for Assignments, in the folder for Characterizing an Academic Community. Type answers directly into the worksheet underneath the appropriate question.



UPLOAD WHAT IS YOUR ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE? WORKSHEET assignment by returning to the instructions file for the  worksheet. Submit by Sunday, Feb. 7, by 11:59 PM


 If unsure how to submit, watch Submit an Assignment (Student)   (0:56)



WEEK 3: FEB. 8-14

FEB. 12: LAST DAY TO DROP CLASSES WITH 100% REFUND


An overview of the 5 basic criteria for researched publications:

NOTE: Be sure to watch this, as it is the basis for the Academic Analysis

Evaluating Sources


Select a current research study on a topic relevant to your discourse community and published in a respected scholarly journal.

NOTE: Since the library resources are restricted to the Mason community, you will need to log in to access the video, using your Masonlive user name and password.)



Why locating  quality research publications is confusing:

All Scientific Papers Should be Free; Here's Why They're Not   (4:42)



GMU's superior collection of research databases provides reliable articles through the GMU Library collection, free and pre-screened, to users in the Mason community.


Looking for excellence in research and writing:

Analyzing Research Articles: A Guide for Readers and Writers


An extremely thorough review of the criteria required to meet the highest standards



Understanding the different parts of an empirical research study:

Sample Article: Computer Science and IT



Mason science librarian Theresa Calcagno annotated this article to discuss the conventions of reporting out empirical/primary research.   Just click on each part of the article for a discussion of the content that explains the rationale.


Comprehend research articles:

Tutorial: How to Read and Comprehend Scientific Research Articles  (5:03)

Strategies for Reading Academic Articles

How to Read and Understand a Scientific Paper: A Step-by-Step Guide for Non-Scientists



Use these strategies to make sure you thoroughly understand the study you intend to write about so you can analyze it accurately and thoughtfully.




Comprehending technical research:


How to Read a Paper

How to Read a Coronavirus Study, or any Science Study

NOTE:You may need to access this article from The New York Times through Mason's library database collection


The first article uses IEEE format to describe reading different parts of an empirical article for different information needs. The second demystifies the construction of a research article for a well-educated, intelligent but non-research reader.


Recognize poorly written or conducted studies:

10 Tips for Writing a Truly Terrible Journal Article

Many Scentific Studies Can't be Replicated. That's a Problem.


A Scholarly Sting Operation Shines a Light on 'Predatory' Journals
NOTE:You may need to access this article from The New York Times through Mason's library database collection


Check your proposed article to make sure it avoids the (humorous, but real) errors listed in the first link.  The other two point to serious vulnerabilities within the current academic research system.





WEEK 4:   FEB. 15-21


TUESDAY, FEB. 16: LAST DAY TO DROP WITH 50% REFUND


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 17:  BEGIN UNRESTRICTED WITHDRAWAL PERIOD



Review of purposes and skills used in annotation:

Annotating Text (7:07)

A Guide to Annotating Texts  (1:51)


Annotation is widely regarded as a major tool for reading comprehension and retention. Review its purposes to see how your skills will progress.


Raising annotation to another level:

More Than Highlighting: Creative Annotations



Increase your engagement by varying the format of your annotations


Get ready to write: Quick review of critical thinking:

Critical Thinking Definition, Skills, and Examples


Reviewing appropriate content for your annotations



Combining Two Skills:

What is the Difference Between Analysis and Annotation?


Employing two important reading skills and articulating them in one assignment


Create In-text citations and references for quotations and borrowed material:

In-Text Citations: The Basics

GMU Writing Center Quick Guides
Scroll down to Citing Sources, then chose between APA, Chicago, MLA or Turabian.  For other formats, consult the Help with Formatting Research Papers link on our Blackboard course menu


Along with the References page, this will prevent plagiarism



Write for the university discourse community:

Using Academic Language

The Tone of Academic Writing (6:10)

Academic Writing Language and Style 
(1:49)


Be sure you are writing for the university discourse community, now and all future papers for English 302 as well as your discourse community while you are in college orgraduate school


Include a references page for your article and any other resources in the paper, using the style appropriate to your discipline

In Blackboard, locate the subheading for Academic Resources for Students.  Click Help with Formatting Research Papers for any array of support sites for the different styles.


If using APA style, also remember to check out the APA Style Blog for changes since the newest version came out in October 2019.




SUBMIT THE FILE CONTAINING THE SCHOLARLY ARTICLE, ANNOTATED TO MEET THE CRITERIA IN THE ANALYSIS OF ACADEMIC DISCOURSE, to Blackboard by Sunday, Feb. 21, at 11:59 PM.

If unsure how to submit, watch "How to Submit an Assignment in Blackboard Learn"


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WRITING FOR THE PUBLIC


 

WEEK 5: FEB. 22-28


CONTENT FOCI: ANALYSIS OF STYLE, AUDIENCE AND TYPICAL CONTENT FOR A PUBLICATION CONVEYING RESEARCH FINDINGS TO THE PUBLIC


WRITING FOCI: CHANGING STYLE AND VOCABULARY FROM ACADEMIC TO POPULAR, PRODUCING A TEXT TYPICALLY APPEARING IN POPULAR OR TRADE PUBLICATIONS



READINGS

ACTIVITIES

DUE DATES FOR ASSIGNMENTS


Begin the Public Writing Assignment:

Go to the Instructions file on Public Writing 
in the folder for Public Writing in Blackboard under Instructions for Assignments,


Get a thorough overview of the requirements and goals for the Public Writing assignment   Look CAREFULLY at both the instructions file and the scoring rubric.



Decide whether to work with the scholarly article you previously analyzed, or whether to choose another.  If changing, repeat the choice process from that assignment.  Highlight the important content that will be explained in the public article.

OPTIONAL: If you are clear about your research paper topic, you may be able to use the two pieces in this assignment in your research paper as well.



Review publications by professional associations:

Associations Unlimited  in GMU library databases

The 10 Most Popular Newspapers in the World

Top USA RSS feeds


As the source for your public article, choose either a respected major outlet  such as a newspaper, newsfeed or magazine, or a respected trade publication.  Read its instructions to authors about the style of public writing they prefer.


Appealing to magazine readers:

6 Important Tips for Magazine Article Writing

How to Write a Magazine Article


Look over all the article types to select the one that you think will best convey the content of the scholarly article to the reading public


Appealing to news article readers:

How to Write an Effective News Article

How to Write a Science News Story Based on a Research Paper





Appealing to readers of press relelases:

How to Write the Best Press Releases

Scientific Press Releases 2020


By the end of this week, decide which one of the article types will best serve your subject matter and audience



Confirm your choice of empirical and public articles by downloading and completing the Public Writing Worksheet found in the Public Writing folder. Fill out the Worksheet to compare and contrast the scholarly and popular approaches to the same material,


UPLOAD THE PUBLIC WRITING WORKSHEET TO BLACKBOARD by Sunday, Feb. 28, at 11:59 PM

If unsure how to submit, watch "How to Submit an Assignment in Blackboard Learn"


WEEK 6: MARCH 1-7

MONDAY, MARCH 1: UNRESTRICTED WITHDRAWAL ENDS

TUESDAY, MARCH 2: SELECTIVE WITHDRAWAL BEGINS WITH 100% TUITION LIABILITY



IMPORTANT:
This week, you will receive an email inviting you  to
sign up for a conference day/time, to be held within the next two weeks: MARCH 8-19. (Weeks 7-8).  Conferences may be by Zoom or telephone . You will be discussing and determining your research paper/lit review topic. Students who have not responded by Friday, MARCH 5, will be assigned any remaining dates/times.


Sign up for research conference on Google Docs by Friday, March 5 at 11:59.

Consult a sample paper:

Translating a Scholarly Article for a Public Audience


Completing your assigned task: see whether you can do a better job of analyzing the differences between the two types



Understanding the needs of the audience:

Communicating Your Research to the Public: What to Say and How to Say it (2:22)


Why Scientific Papers are Growing Increasingly Inscrutable


Think through the characteristics of the publication's readers as demonstrated in other articles in that publication.  Especially consider how the heavy use of scientific jargon drives most readers away.



Keeping annotations brief but on-point:

Writing Concisely


As you begin writing your chosen format, be sure you are switching code from academic vocabulary to the vocabulary suitable to the audience for the publication you selected.




Reread Steps 4 and 5 of the Instructions file, plus the Scoring Rubric, to prepare you to write the anotations that accompany your public article. (HINT: Reread them again after you think you have completed the asignment to be sure that you have included all elements.)








UPLOAD THE SCHOLARLY ARTICLE TO BLACKBOARD by Sunday, March 7, at 11:59M.



By the end of the week, review your scholarly and public articles to be sure you have important inisights into the differences between them. This is especially important because science and technology are areas where the ability to explain complex content to the public is extremely important but relatively rare.


SUBMIT THE FILE CONTAINING THE ANNOTATED PUBLIC ARTICLE to Blackboard by Sunday,  March 7, at 11:59 PM.

If unsure how to submit, watch "How to Submit an Assignment in Blackboard Learn"



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CONFERRING ON RESEARCH PROPOSALS

 

WEEK 7:   MARCH 8-14


CONTENT FOCUS: PREPARING FOR ANALYSIS OF EMPIRICAL RESEARCH AND A LITERATURE REVIEW


WRITING FOCI: SUMMARY, IMRAD FORMAT


This module ensures that all students have a viable, researchable toipic which covers important developments--research and commercial--in their respective disciplines.  It requires a conference wIth the professor, either face to face, by telephone, or by bideo chat such as Skype or What'sApp.

READINGS

ACTIVITIES

DUE DATES FOR ASSIGNMENTS

 

STOP RIGHT HERE while you thoroughly reread the requirements for the Annotated Bibliography and the Research Paper.  If you have questions about them, contact the professor NOW so you can proceed through Weeks 7-13 with confidence.



In Blackboard, go to  Instructions for
Assignments
then the folder for Conferring on Research Proposals, then file containing the Scoring Rubric for Research Paper


Review the Scoring Rubric so you know how your participation will be scored.  A successful conference is highly correlated to success on both the Annotated Bibliography and the Research Paper.



Using the Instructions file for the Conference on Research Paper, prepare the proposal document.  Items 2,4,5 and 7 must be contained in the document.



Upload the Conference document to the Instructions file for the Conference on Research Paper in the folder Conferring on Research Proposals.  Submit BEFORE your research conference.



This week, your sole assignment is to be prepared for the research conference by choosing a viable topic for your research for the remainder of the semester.  Make sure it is a new and important development in your discipline which is visible in scholarly research as well as in the commercial or nonprofit world.  Above all, be sure it is interesting and valuable to you.

Attend your research conference at the time you signed up for,

Since
conferences
are only 15 minutes long, it is mportant to be on time, organized and ready to talk. DO NOT BE LATEas it cuts into others' conference time.



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RESEARCHING ETHICALLY


WEEK 8: MARCH 15-21

CONTENT FOCI: INTELLECTUAL INTEGRITY, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND PLAGIARISM IN ACADEMIA

WRITING FOCI: PARAPHRASE, DIRECT AND INDIRECT QUOTATION, ATTRIBUTION

This module stresses the accurate, responsible use of research sources such as those located in the previous module.  Beginning in the academic environment, including the upcoming Research Paper, it also emphasizes the ethical use of intellectual property related to public-facing sources and gray literature.


Sample cases shows the need for ethical behavior at the college level:

Academic Integrity

More than 800 Russian Academic Articles Retracted after "Bombshell" Report Reveals Plagiarism and Other Misconduct

The Truth is Paywalled but the Lies are Free


The importance of research integrity in a university setting.
An ongoing problem in countries where universities and their research libraries are poorly funded but commerical research publishers demand high prices.  George Mason has one of the best collections of research databases in the United States, so our students are very fortunate.

(NOTE: If you are off campus, the library website may prompt you to log in, as access is restricted to the GMU community.)


GMU's policies on plagiarism:

The GMU Honor Code


Learn the university policies that govern cheating, plagiarism and copyright  for faculty, administrators and students


World Book and Copyright Day:

World Book and Copyright Day

A Video for World Book and Copyright Day by UNESCO


The importance of boks and copyright worldwide is now recognized by UNESCO, protector world heritage--sites, intangible cultural heritage and intangible legacy


Reviewing Your Background Knowledge:

Nine Things You Should Already Know About Plagiarism

How to Recognize Plagiarism


Develop an understanding of importance of intellectual property in higher education. Also note the "Three Things You Don't Need to Worry About."


Respecting copyright for visual images as well as text:

8 Best Websites for Copyright-free Images

Finding Public Domain and Creative Commons Media


Remember that Google Images contains both copyrighted and copyright-free images


Public  Domain Day provides free books:

Public Domain Day 2021


Once a year--on January 1--materials published in the United States 95 years ago lose their copyright protection and become available to the general public



In Blackboard, go to  Instructions for Assignments, then the folder for IResearching Ethically, then the file named  "IRIS Plagiarism Test--Instructions."  Carefully follow the directions in the file of Instructions,  since the procedure is different from the usual submission.


Submit the emailed results of the IRIS PLAGIARISM TEST by returning to the test instructions file. Be sure that the screen shot shows your name as well as your score. Submit by Sunday,  March 21, by 11:59 PM

 If unsure how to submit, watch Submit an Assignment (Student)   (0:56)


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ANNOTATING RESEARCH SOURCES



WEEK 9: MARCH 22-28

CONTENT FOCUS: GREY LITERATURE VS. ACADEMIC RESEARCH SOURCES

WRITING FOCI:  APA OR OTHER DISCIPLINARY FORMAT  FOR REFERENCES, CORRECT TEXT FORMATTING FOR AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY, CONCISE NESS, SUMMARY

READINGS                                                                     
ACTIVITIES                                                                                   
DUE DATES FOR ASSIGNMENTS

Assignment requirements:

Instructions for Annotated Bibliography and Proposal and its accompanying scoring rubric, are found in the folder Annotating Research Sources, under Instructions for Assignments

BEFORE YOU DO ANYTHING ELSE, READ THE INSTRUCTIONS FILE, ESPECIALLY NOTING STEP 1 AND THE PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS AT THE END. YOU WILL BE DOING THE SAME TOPIC FOR BOTH THE ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY AND THE RESEARCH PAPER, SO CHOOSE CAREFULLY.  Your skills in analyzing research will be used to choose excellent articles in support of your topic for the Annotated Bibliography and following that, the Research Paper. You will be adding grey literature as well.



A thorough overview of annotated bibliographies:

A Guide to Annotated Bibliographies

Annotated Bibliographies

Annotated Bibliography Breakdown


Understanding the purpose of an annotated bibliography and its usefulness to future
 extended research



A guide to locating sources using the Mason Library:

NOTE: Be sure to watch this, as it is the basis for identifying scholarly research which is not available on the open Web.


Eng 302


Select current research (no more than 5-7 years old) on a topic relevant to your discourse community and published in a respected scholarly journal.

NOTE: Since the library resources are restricted to the Mason community, you will need to log in to access the video, using your Masonlive user name and password.


The importance of grey literature in research:

Grey Literature: What is It?: The Value of Grey Literature

What is Grey Literature and How Do I Find It?


Explains how scholarly studies can be extended into the real world



Summary of sources of grey literature:

Gray Literature


A list of forms of grey literature plus tabs to lists of preprints, e-prints, technical reports
and a long list of gateways to searches for grey literature in general


Using grey literature in your annotated bibliography:

Gray literature 101: More about Gray Lit

Research Process: Grey Literature


The pro's and cons of using grey literature in your academic work


Justifying your choice of research sources:

Six Key Considerations for Innovative Proposals


Once your sources are assembled, add insights from the articles to your original ideas of the value of your topic


Outlined instructions with examples for two different discourse communities:

Proposal Writing


Slideshare presentation is presented in three parts: What is a Proposal, A Formal Proposal and An Informal Proposal



Understanding academic tone in your career or major:

How to Write an Excellent Formal Essay

How to Write in an Academic Style


Focus on the differences between academic writing (a highly specialized genre) and other professional writing tasks and styles


The lexis of academic discourse communities:

Using Appropriate Words in an Academic Essay

Verbs in Academic Writing

Academic Words


Use these examples to influence your own style and approach Note the focus on verbs as a major way to identify academic lexis.

Submit the QUOTATIONS QUIZ  to Blackboard by Sunday, March 28, at 11:59 PM. Look for the Instructions file in the folder for Annotating Research Sources

If unsure how to submit, watch "How to Submit an Assignment in Blackboard Learn"


WEEK 10: MARCH 29-APRIL 4

THURSDAY, APRIL 1: END SELECTIVE WITHDRAWAL PERIOD


Practice in turning non-academic writing to academic style:

Writing in a Formal Style: Practice

Exercise: Making Descriptions Specific


Practice exercises provide feedback that allow you to gauge how well you are transitioning from informal to formal writing style.  Pay careful attention to the use of quotations from academic materials and how to punctuate them.


The look and content of an annotated entry:

Sample Annotated Bibliography


Annotated bibliographies have their own distinctive appearance


A review of the accepted formatting :

Creating Annotated Bibliographies based on APA style


A printable PDF with sample annotations and bibliography entries


A review of APA reference style:

Reference List: Basic Rules

Reference List: Articles in Periodicals



Mastery of your discipline's style in references is expected in this highly formatted style of paper, and again in the final assignment, the Research Paper.  These links are taken from the most authoritative online writing lab, The OWL at Purdue


Optional: Let the GMU Writing Center help finalize your paper:

Revising

23 Ways to Improve Your Draft

How to Edit Your Own Essays: Strategies for ESL Students


Make final edits (small; your responsibility) and/or revisions (large, which the tutor will help you with) as needed to prepare aexcellent annotations containing intellectual analysis phrased in academic style.





SUBMIT THE FILE CONTAINING THE ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY  to Blackboard by Sunday, April 4, at 11:59 PM. Look for the Instructions file in the folder for Annotating Research Sources.

If unsure how to submit, watch "How to Submit an Assignment in BlackboardLearn"


NOTE: Special option for this assignment.

Students will have the opportunity  to revise this assignment.  
In Backboard, go to Instructions for Assignments, then the folder for Annotating Research Sources. Scroll down to the very last file, Option to Revise the Annotated Bibliography.)


Note that this is the ONLY assignment that offers an opportunity to revise the paper if the original submission is not satisfactory.  Specific requirements are attached to this chance to improve your writing, so read the file carefully if interested.


 

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RESEARCHING IN A DISCIPLINE



WEEK 11: APRIL 5-11


CONTENT FOCUS: ASSESSING THE QUALITY AND SCOPE OF RESEARCH ON A SPECIFIC TOIC; IDENTIFYING GAPS AND FUTURE NEEDS FOR RESEARCH


WRITING FOCUS: CRITICAL ANALYSIS, PERSUASIVE WRITING TECHNIQUES, TRANSITIONAL EXPRESSIONS, FIELD-APPROPRIATE DOCUMENTATION, COMPARISON AND CONTRAST,


This module synthesizes all the major elements of your learning this semester:

  • Synthesis research and writing, combining primary and scholarly sources with gray literature and public forums
  • Standards and expectations for research in your field of study
  • Mastery of the appropriate documentation format for your discipline
  • Use of appropriate vocabulary, sentence structure and organizational patterns for college-level writing
  • Maintaining a level of discourse, including tone and diction, appropriate to a scholar in your field

At the same time, it offers an opportunity to expand the functionality of a scholar into the 21st century by projecting ways that your field can be extended and enhanced


READINGS

ACTIVITIES

DUE DATES FOR ASSIGNMENTS





Review the requirements for the Research Paper very carefully by going into Blackboard,  to the folder on Researching in a Discipline, then the instructions for Research Innovations Paper and its accompanying Scoring Rubric.




Next, match those requirements against the sources in your Annotated Bibliography to determine what information is still missing for a fully informed paper.  Begin looking for the remaining sources IMMEDIATELY



New trends in researched writing:


How to Write a Paper to Communicate Your Research (8:39)



Critiquing your paper for discipline-appropriate style
Critiquing for documentation and form




Understanding types of research papers

The Differences Between an Analytical and an Argumentative Paper




Tone, audience and style in researched writing
Use of first and third persons; noun/pronoun agreement
Types of research paper




Recognizing an excellent combination of research and persuasion

APA Research Paper by Luisa Mirano

APA 7th Edition Sample Papers

IEEE General Format



Observe how strong research pursues a research question to come to a distinct conclusion.

NOTE: Ms. Mirano's paper used the 6th edition of the APA Publication Manual, so do not use it as a model for fomatting the references page, which now relies on the 7th edition.



List of steps for incorporating research into argumentation:


Persuasive Research Paper Writing Guide




Thesis vs. research question.  Thesis statement creator.
Workshop on audience expectations: review each otherís theses/questions and list desired information




WEEK  12: APRIL 12-18



The need for critical reasoning and argumentation skills:

Colleges Fail to Improve Thinking Skills   (7:32)


Understand how the Research Paper works to build critical employment skills largely missing in many college graduates


Combining Critical Thinking, Writing and Action:

6 Steps for Effective Critical Thinking


Combining paper-writing skills with implementation of the paper's conclusions


Choosing an organizational strategy:

Patterns of Organization


Decide on an the optimal organizational strategy for incorporating empirical research, public writing and grey literature


The Rogerian approach to persuasion:

What is Rogerian Argument? (2:13)

The Santa Myth--Rogerian Argument (3:03)


Rogerian argumentation: Using shared ground to reach agreement


The Toulmin approach to persuasion:


Toulmin Model of Argument (8:34)


Toulmin's Model of Argumentation--Legalizing Marijuana



Toulmin argumentation: The use of logic and evidence to prove one's point


Using interviews in a research paper:


T
ed-Ed Talk: How to use Experts and When Not To (10:38)



Adding commercial and industry sources
Expert interviews--live and recorded
Reliability and validity of consumer/user input
Use of graphics



Handling the opposition:

Showing Awareness of the Counter Argument (5:51)

Counterargument



Recognizing and dealing with counter-arguments and opposition

Appropriate langauge for constructing a counterargument




WEEK 13: APRIL 19-25

FRIDAY, APRIL 23: UNESCO WORLD BOOK AND COPYRIGHT DAY




Carefully read the Class messages for the Week as well as the Instructions for Peer Review of Research Paper in the Blackboard folder on Researching in a Discipline



Use quoted material strategically:

How to Use Quotations in Writing Essays--APA or MLA (2:53)

How to Frame Quotations

Quotations (a thorough guide)

When to Summarize, Paraphrase and Quote


One of the key identifiers of academic writing.  It signals that the writer understands the material they read, can idenitfy key points and express them concisely, and can proficiently use the most difficult punctuation set in English


Using academic style while constructing your argument:

Formal Writing Voice

Reducing Informality in Academic Writing


Quick review : Third Person Point of View and other traits of formal academic writing as you begin drafting your paper



Advice on showing the relationships between ideas:

Improving Cohesion: The "Known/New Contract"

Writing Transitions and Transitional Devices

Sentence Templates + Transitions


Using transitions and connectors to show interrelationships between texts.  The second link provides a list of words to use to cue readers to interpret ideas the way you want them to.



A succinct procedure for pulling it all together:

Help!  I've Been Asked to Synthesize!


Summarizes do's and don'ts in synthesis writing


Coursera describes the rationale for synthesis writing for its Advanced Writing course:

Synthesis Essay Video Lecture



A clear explanation of the finer points of writing a perceptive and original synthesis essay



By Tuesday, April 20, write a complete draft of your Research Paper (not including the Title Page or References page) so it is ready for the benefit of your classmates' critiques




UPLOAD YOUR DRAFT to the Peer Review of Research Paper (under My Groups heading at bottom of course menu in the class Blackboard folder). In the message, tell your reviewers about the issues you would most like feedback on.

Attach the draft; do NOT paste it into the body of the message.
On the home page for your group, be sure to read the instructions for the peer review process





MIT professors explain why peer review is central to academic practice, both for students and professionals:

No One Writes Alone: Peer Review in the Classroom - A Guide For Students  (6:33)



Also by Tuesday, April 20, locate and fill out the Formative Review in the folder for Researching in a Discipline. Complete it in reference to your own paper so you can see what elements need addressing while your draft is still in development.


Upload Research Paper DRAFT AND THE FORMATIVE REVIEW
 to the Peer Review of Research Paper discussion board by Tuesday, April 20,
 by 11:59 PM


Five tips for writing helpful peer reviews:

How to Give Constructive Feedback  (1:03)

REVIEW YOUR GROUP MEMBERS' DRAFTS, following the Instructions in the file for Peer Review of Research Paper and post to your group.  Remember to complete both  the Summative rubrics for each draft, then paste it into the end of the person's draft file.


Complete PEER REVIEW by Friday, April 23, at 11:59 PM



Revise and COMPLETE YOUR RESEARCH PAPER AND SUBMIT to Blackboard.  Remember to upload articles reviewed in your paper- that were NOT included in your Annotated Bibliography--not just links to them


SUBMIT THE RESEARCH PAPER  by returning to the Instructions file for the Research Innovations Paper. Submit  by Sunday,
April 25





If unsure how to submit, watch "How to Submit an Assignment in Blackboard Learn"


Keep firmly in mind that the Research Paper cannot be submitted late and that if you do not submit this paper, complete with title page, abstract, body, internal citations and references, by Sunday, April 25, by 11:59 PM, you WILL NOT PASS the class.


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LEADING FOR CHANGE


WEEK 14: APRIL 26-MAY 2

FRIDAY, APRIL 30: LAST DAY OF CLASSES

SATURDAY, MAY 1:  READING DAY

CONTENT FOCI: EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP, PERSONAL BRANDING, SWOT, CONTRIBUTING TO A SOCIAL OR PROFESSIONAL CAUSE

WRITING FOCI: SYNTHESIS, CRITICAL ANALYSIS, ACADEMIC AND PUBLIC DISCURSE, PARALLEL STRUCTURE

The semester culminates in this module, a synthesis activity which combines a major  behavioral model, personal essay material and formal research data. It uses the organizational structure of a critical analysis to construct an effective visual presentation.




Prepare for the Presentation:


Read the instructions file and scoring rubric for the assignment on "Visual Presentation on Leadership," located in Blackboard under Instructions for Assignments, in the folder for Contributing to Public Discourse



Become thoroughly familiar with the instructions and the scoring rubric by Tuesday, April 27




Seriously reflect on a major professional or social issue that is very important to you. Looking at your SWOT analysis and personal brand, decide how you could contribute to resolving that issue using your academic and/or public discourse skills.



Learn about the three leadership models for this project:


Recording #10  (1:56)



BE SURE TO LISTEN TO THE RECORDING prepared by instructor explaining the  effectiveness of each of the three leadership models.

Prepare to evaluate yourself as a future leader by assembling your worksheets, SWOT analysis and personal branding analysis essay.




Why leadership style matters:

Stop Managing, Start Leading  (TedX Talk)  (18:12)

The Importance of Leadership
in Business


Consider the importance of your own future leadership role in your career planning; compare yourself to the qualities explained by Hamza Khan in an Educational TED Talk


Considering your options as a leader:

In the Instructions for Assignments, go to the folder for Contributing to Discourse.  Open the file on "Resources for Three Leadership Styles" and follow the links to learn about each one.


IMPORTANT: By the end of the week, review Three Major Models of  Leadership: Situational, Inspirational and Transformational,  to  decide which style best suits you, your leadership goals and your effective contribution to the issue of your choice.  You may combine elements from different styles if you wish


The challenges of moving up as a young scientist:

Help Young Scientists


A realistic assessment of the challenges faced by young researchers as they try to move forward in their disciplines


Transitioning to leadership and management roles:

Promoted from Peer to Leader?  17 Ways to Make a Smooth Transition

Hit the Ground Running: Transitioning to New Leadership Roles


How to make the essential career shift that opens paths to increased effectiveness with minimum stress combined with maximum comfort and success


Effecting professional or social change:

Qualities of Effective Change Agents

Want to Advocate for Change?  Here are Three Realities You Need to Know

Advocating for Change


Consider the social and emotional demands of acting in the public interest.  Review some approaches that a private citizen can take.


MAKE SURE YOUR GRADES IN THIS CLASS ARE CORRECT

HAPPY NOTE: since this is a writing class without tests, there is NO final exam.  Once you have submitted the Visual Presentation, your work in this class will be complete. 


In Blackboard, go to My Grades.  Check to make sure that all grades (possibly excepting the Research Paper, which may not be graded by that time) appear and are recorded accurately.  Notify the instructor IMMEDIATELY of any errors. If all grades are correctly recorded, no action is needed.

IMPORTANT: This is an opportunity to correct errors only, not to rewrite, resubmit or ask for extra credit.  As per the Course Description, none of these options is available in our class


EMAIL ANY RECORDING ERRORS to the professor by Sunday, May 2, by 11:59 PM.

WEEK 15: MAY 3-9

MONDAY, MAY 3: SEMESTER EXAMS BEGIN

MONDAY, MAY 10: SEMESTER EXAMS END


Some options if you prefer not to use PowerPoint:

5 Best Free Animated Presentation Software and PowerPoint Alternatives

How to Create Prezi Effect in PowerPoint 2016


Decide on the software you will use for your presentation


Quick advice on both content and design:

Top 10 Slide Tips
or
8 Tips To Create Epic Visual Presentations


Plan the appearance of your presentation, avoiding text-heavy slides.

If needed, view help files if you are using Power Point or Prezi


Top-quality examples:

Top 20 Best PowerPoint Presentations--Cubicle Ninjas


See complete, highly effective presentations on various topics. (Scroll down to access individual presentations and their strengths)



Prepare presentation, following  directions in the file Visual Presentation on Leadership--Instructions, found in Blackboard under Instructions for Assignments in the Contributing to Discourse folder



Up-to-the-minute advice:

Jeff Bezos Banned this from Meetings, but it's Not Dead Yet

How to Design a Good Slide PowerPoint Tutorial (6:43)

How to Avoid Death by PowerPoint (20:31)


Avoiding the worst; emphasizing the best

Troubleshoot your presentation. Make adjustments as needed


Why viewers/readers want you to use parallel structure:

Parallel Structure: Patterns are Pleasing


Learn to format bulleted lists correctly in your presentation. (Note: ALL written lists should have parallel structure, not just PowerPoint presentations!)

Read and check your presentation wording before submitting





SUBMIT YOUR VISUAL PRESENTATION ON LEADING FOR CHANGE in Blackboard by returning to the file for that assignment in the folder for Contributing to Discourse.  Submit by Sunday, May 9. by 11:59 PM.

If unsure how to submit, watch 
"How to Submit an Assignment in Blackboard Learn"

IMPORTANT NOTE: Class grades will become final on Monday, May 10, at 11:59 PM.  Any presentation submitted after that will not earn credit.





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