The University of Western Australia

 

The Graduate School of Management

 

1999 TRIMESTER C COURSE OUTLINE

 

INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 455.560

 

UNIT DESCRIPTION:

This unit provides an overview of current thinking and trends in the management of information, information technology, and information systems in organisations and in business. The course assumes no prior study of information systems or information technology. Outcomes of the course include: an understanding of how information is used in and by organisations; recognition of the computing and communications technologies used by modern organisations; understanding of how organisations can identify and apply appropriate information management practices to attain benefits, to avoid dangers, and to work effectively .  Students will use electronic communications to experience new ways of working in virtual teams.

THE LECTURER:

Sylvia Murphy

B.A. (Hons), Univeristy of Sydney; MBA, University of WA; is a senior lecturer at the GSM.  Sylvia has taught information and decision systems, and Management of Information Systems previously in this program.  Prior to joining the GSM Sylvia worked in the public and private sectors, holding senior positions in information and technology and general management areas in several agencies.

REQUIRED TEXT:

"Managing  IT as a Strategic Resource",  Leslie Willcocks, David Feeny and Gerd Islei.  McGraw Hill, 1997. 

You are also required to purchase a copy of the Jacob Suchard Case “Jacobs Suchard: The reorganization for 1992”  HBS N1-489-106

 

Office:

2.09 Myers Street Building

Telephone:

9380 3820

Facsimile:

9380 1072

E-mail

smurphy@ecel.uwa.edu.au

Lectures:

Thursday  6:00 - 9:00 pm

Venue:

Myers Case Study Room 1

Consultation Times with Lecturer:

by email and by appointment

Submission & Return of Reports & Assignments:

See Course Administration and Assessment Schedule.


COURSE AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

The 1990s have been a time of sustained focus on the role of information and knowledge, and the supporting technology applications and infrastructure which  have enabled organisations to improve business operations and business communication. Together, these developments in philosophy and technology have presented unprecedented opportunities for new businesses and for the transformation of existing organisations. Global computer-based communication networks have put ‘globalisation’ within the reach of individuals, small business, government, and not-for-profit organisations, as well as large corporations. These opportunities have, of course, been accompanied by management challenges.

The field of information management has grown out of information systems management, organisational communication, office administration, and library and information science to encompass the principles and practices needed to manage information, information systems, and information technology in modern organisations. As a field of study, information management is emerging and developing rapidly. In this unit, you will be exposed to current thinking in information management. You will discover that the focus is on information, communication, knowledge, and organisational performance rather than on technology. But we will not ignore the technology that has enabled recent revolutions in management thinking and management practice to take effect!

Information Management 560 aims to extend students’ understanding of the opportunities that recent developments in information management provide for business operations and business development, and to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to participate effectively in information management as managers. By the end of the course, students should

·       have the necessary knowledge of key concepts, terminology, and technology of information management to effectively communicate with colleagues, managers, and information management professionals about information management issues, applications, and practices;

·       be familiar with current leading organisational applications of information management to improve business operations and management;

·       have sufficient knowledge of information management practices to participate effectively as members of information teams which implement, source, evaluate, and plan information management initiatives;

·       be able to identify, and critically analyse the probable implications of developments in information management, information systems, and information and telecommunications technologies for business, government, individuals, and society;

·       have the necessary knowledge and skills to communicate effectively using computer-mediated communication tools.

APPROACH TO LEARNING

The emphasis is on information, knowledge, and learning, supported by appropriate technology. Key concepts are introduced in readings, seminars,  mini-lectures, or (most often) a combination of the three. You will have opportunities to use the computer-based communication technologies believed to enable organisations to improve communication, processes, and performance. You will evaluate the extent to which these technologies do in fact enable the promised networked, global, and transformed organisations.

The brief seminar programme on page 4 shows the sequence in which we will address information management topics. The assignments are used to develop your skills as users of computer-based communication technologies, to provide you with opportunities to examine specific issues in depth, and to reflect on and to evaluate opportunities and challenges of computer-based communication technologies and organisational performance.

Generally the classes will be divided into two parts, the first part being a seminar with mini-lecture. To prepare for this part, you will need to complete the set reading and reflect on any set questions before coming to class. The second part will be devoted to group work, a workshop session, or a guest lecture, depending on the topic.

RECOMMENDED TEXTS

The required text (Willcocks, Feeny and Islei) provides an excellent basis for much, but not all of the course.  Additional readings will be provided during the course.  Students will be expected to extend their reading  through use of library (including on-line) resources.

 

 

ASSESSMENT

 

Due

Marks

Total percent

Group Assignment and Presentation

14 October or

 28 October

 

30%

 

 

 

 

Virtual Organisation Workshop

 

 

30%

             Team Totem exercise

23 September

10

 

             Team Contract

30 September

 

 

            Analysis of Jacob Suchard Case

21October

15

 

Peer evaluation

21October

5

 

 

 

 

 

Written assignment

25 November

 

40%

 

All assessment will be graded using the UWA grading scheme. A copy of the scheme is attached to this course outline. Please note that your final grade for this unit may not be a simple average of grades or summation of marks for each piece of assessment because I may be required to scale the marks to GSM norms.

Participation must occur during the set dates. Assignments will not normally be accepted after the due date. Under exceptional circumstances, you may be granted an extension, provided you request the extension before the due date. Pressure of work is not an exceptional circumstance! No assignment will be accepted after other students' assignments are returned.

Acknowledgement of Sources in Assignments

The work you submit for each assignment must be your own work, and must fully acknowledge all sources of information used to complete the assignment. Make sure you enclose quotations from other people’s work in quotation marks and acknowledge the source of the work. You should acknowledge written work, oral quotations, contributions made by fellow students, and material from electronic sources such as software manuals and the Internet.

Failure to acknowledge the contribution of other people’s work to your assignment is plagiarism. Regardless of the other qualities of an assignment, you can be failed for plagiarism! On the other hand, marks are awarded for proper acknowledgement of sources.

Citation of Electronic Sources

When you cite electronic sources, such as WWW pages, use a format consistent with the style you use to cite print sources. Make sure you give enough information for a reader to locate the electronic source. Some guides to citation of electronic sources are:

Land, T. [a.k.a Beads] (1996, Nov 25). Web extension to American Psychological Association style (WEAPAS): Proposed standard for referencing online documents in scientific publications. [WWW document]. URL http://www.beadsland.com/weapas/

Li, X. and Crane, N. B. (1993). Electronic style: A handbook for citing electronic information. Medford, N.J.: Information Today, 1996 [HSS 808.027 1996 ELE]

Walker, J. R.  and Taylor, T. The Columbia Guide to Online Style Columbia UP, 1998.  See  http://www.columbia.edu/cu/cup/cgos/

Group Assignment and Presentation (30%)

You will be formed into teams of 3 to 4 students to research a topic within the broad area of  "network enabled systems" or "information technology management".  A list of specific topics will be provided at the beginning of the course.  Your team will also be provided with a contact in an organisation in Perth which has, or is in the process of, implementing or dealing with the topic outlined.  The contacts, from both private and public sector organisations, have agreed to meet with team members to discuss the topic as it relates to their organisation during an interview lasting approximately one hour.

 

Your team will present your topic to the class in either lecture 7 (14 October) or lecture 9 (28 October), and hand in a paper for marking by Novermber 4.

Virtual Organisation Workshop (VOW) Assignment (30%, project begins 9 September, ends 21 October)

The project has the following goals:

·         To deepen understanding of international change management and consulting issues

·         To develop skills for communication and collaboration, especially as required for success in geographically-dispersed teams, inter-organizational teams, and international teams, all of which are becoming more prevalent and important

·         To develop skills for working cross-culturally

·         To expand technical skills through the use of groupware, electronic mail, web pages, audio and video-conferencing, and document sharing in the service of collaboration

·         To leverage the expertise and resources of faculty and students at the three participating universities in the service of everyone's professional and creative development

 

UWA MBA Students - Allocation of marks to the VOW assignment

 

VOW Team Totem and Team Contract (10 marks)

See the VOW website for details of this task

 

VOW Participation (5 marks)

Students will be asked to assess each other’s participation on a scale of 0 to 5.  Further details about this component of the exercise are found on the VOW website.

 

Jacob Suchard Case Analysis  (15 marks)

As a team, you are asked to develop an analysis of the Jacob Suchard case.  The case analysis will be marked jointly by myself and the Catherine Cramton, of George Mason University.  All team members will receive the same mark for this analysis.

Final Written assignment (40 marks)

I will hand the requirements for the final assignment to you at the lecture on November 4 1999.  The assignment will also be emailed to you.  The assignment must be handed into the GSM by 5pm on November 25, 1999.  The word limit for this work is 3000 words.

 

 

 

 

SEMINAR PROGRAMME IN BRIEF

 

 

Weeks

Topic

Text

Other Readings

1 - 3

Achieving business value from information and systems

 

 

 

1

Introduction to course, key concepts associated with "information management"

 

Virtual Organisation Workshop - introduction to the project, workshop on using ICQ (chat software)

 

Chapters 3, 4

 

 

 

 

 

Handout - ICQ chat

2

Factors contributing to the success of information systems

Chapter 8

Case Study handout

3

Why information systems fail

Chapter 9

Case Study handout

4 -5

Information technology and telecommunications components

 

 

4

Hardware basics

 

Chapter 14

Handout

5

Telecommunications infrastructure

 

 

Handout

6 - 7

Application systems characteristics

 

 

6

Overview of application systems; overview of software environments; functional application systems; decision support systems

 

Chapter 5

Handout

7

Network enabled systems:  Group support systems;  workflow systems; intranets

 

Chapters 14, 15

Group Presentations (I)

8

Electronic Commerce; Knowledge Management

 

Chapter 16

 

9 - 11

Information Management Practice

 

 

9

Information Technology management

 

Chapters 1, 2, 6

Group Presentations (II)

10

Sourcing Information Services

 

Chapters 11, 12

 

11

Information and Technology Planning and Strategic Alignment

 

Chapter 3

Handout

12

Summary

 

 

 

 

COURSE ADMINISTRATION AND ASSESSMENT SCHEDULE

(Summary of Critical Dates)

 

Week

Date

Event

1

2 September

First lecture - don't miss it!

2

9

Virtual Organization Workshop begins this week (see web page http://www.som.gmu.edu/cramton/orgworkshop2/index.html for details)

3

16

 

4

23

Friday 24 September VOW Totem exercise due by email

5

30

VOW team contract due by email on October 1st

6

7 October

 

7

14

Group presentations (first series) on group support systems, workflow systems, intranets "supporting new ways of work".

 

8

21

Tuesday 19 October VOW Jacob Suchard case analysis due.  Peer evaluation also due this week.

 

9

28

Group presentations (second series) on organizational factors contributing to successful IT implementations.

 

10

4 November

 

11

11

 

12

18

 

 

25

Course Final Assignment Due

 

 

 

 


 

Tentative list of topics and contacts

 

Subject Area

Contact Name

Company

Phone

Fax

Intranet implementation

Vito Forte

Transfield Worley

9281 7808

 

Intranet planning

Philip Bairstow

RPH

9224 1398

 

The IT skills crisis, management strategies

Les Cooper

Lotteries Commission

 

 

Workflow management applications

Nalini Mishra

Education Department

 

 

The Internet for Electronic Commerce - The Government Electronic Market

Jim Meneely

CAMBS

92225393

92225140

User support, including users in remote locations

Rachel Wheeler 9482 1132

John Walsh 9482 1095

Argyle Diamonds

 

 

Banking Environment

Michelle Dolan

BankWest

 

 

 

Ricki Smith

HBF

9265-6130

9380-4769

 

Bob Grummet

Woodside